All posts filed under: Pressure cooker

High Altitude Pressure Cooking Adustments

My question…do you know how long I would cook Instant Pot Pinto Beans at an altitude of 5000 ft? Commenter Rhonda V The rule of thumb for high altitude pressure cooking, Instant Pot or otherwise: For every 1,000 feet above 2,000-foot elevation, increase cooking time by 5 percent. In metric, that’s 5% for every 300 meters above 600 meters. Pressure Cooking Adjustment By Altitude Altitude Increase % Multiply Cooking Time By 3000 ft / 900 m 5% 1.05 4000 ft / 1200 m 10% 1.10 5000 ft / 1500 m 15% 1.15 6000 ft / 1800 m 20% 1.20 7000 ft / 2100 m 25% 1.25 Pressure Cook America Because I’m a habitual map looker, I stumbled across this list of the cities in the United States by elevation. Here are the cities with a population over 100,000 by elevation (according to Wikipedia): City State Altitude Population Increase % CO Springs CO 6035 feet / 1839 m 465,101 20% Centennial CO 5830 ft / 1777 m 110,250 15% Lakewood CO 5518 ft / 1682 m …

A yellow bowl of alubia blanca beans with chorizo and a red sauce, with olive oil and smoked Spanish paprika in the background.

Instant Pot Spanish Farm Beans (Alubia Blanca De La Granja)

I read it for the pictures.1 Joanie Simon, YouTube food photographer extraordinaire, recommended Art Culinaire Magazine for photo inspiration. And, boy, is she right – the pictures are art-film worthy, and the professional chef recipes are way beyond what I cook at home.2 But that doesn’t mean they can’t spark ideas. I noticed Rancho Gordo Alubia Blanca beans mentioned in in a high-end Judiones de la Granja recipe from MiniBar in Washington, DC. This quick mention led me down the path to this recipe – Instant Pot Spanish Farm Beans. De la granja means “of the farm” – this recipe is the Spanish farmhouse version of pork and beans. The pork is dried Spanish chorizo; the beans are small white beans – try to get Alubia Blanca beans from Rancho Gordo if you can, but Navy beans make a good substitute. Add onions, lots of garlic, and a heaping helping of Pimenton de la Vera, Spanish smoked paprika. (Spanish smoked paprika is one of my favorite spices.) To soak or not to soak, that is …

Short ribs with coconut curry sauce in a teal bowl with rice, and bowls of cilantro, shallots, limes, and curry paste in the background

Instant Pot Short Ribs with Coconut Milk and Thai Curry

Bon Appetit’s Short Ribs Slow-Roasted in Coconut Milk inspired me, and I had to do my own take on the recipe. Here it is: Instant Pot Short Ribs with Coconut Milk and Thai Curry. This is a cross-Pacific riff on Thai curry. I borrow the four flavors of Thai food: hot (curry) sour (lime) salty (soy sauce) and sweet (coconut milk). These ribs come out fall-apart tender, and swimming in a flavorful curry sauce. This recipe is not particularly authentic, but it is delicious, and it can be stocked from the International aisle of most grocery stores. It’s also a simple enough recipe to make on a weeknight. The only pre-pressure cooking is a quick sauté of the shallot, garlic, and ginger. After that, it’s dump and stir, and the result is well worth the (minimal) effort. Recipe: Instant Pot Short Ribs with Coconut Milk and Thai Curry Related Posts Pressure Cooker Coconut RicePressure Cooker Thai Panang Beef CurryPressure Cooker Thai Green Chicken CurryPressure Cooker Thai Yellow Chicken CurryMy other Instant Pot Pressure Cooker Recipes …