All posts tagged: pickle

Pickled Dill Carrots

When I put a jar of hot giardiniera on the table, my wife digs in, pushing aside the cauliflower, jalapeños, and other vegetables so she can get at the carrots. Pretty soon all the carrots are gone, and it’s up to me to finish the rest of the jar. Unfortunately, I can ignore things that are right in front of my nose. I spent weeks looking for a hot giardiniera recipe that was canning compatible. I didn’t find one with the same mix of vegetables we get in the grocery store version. I told Diane this, and she said “can you make pickled carrots? That’s my favorite part.” Well, Duh. I knew she only ate the carrots. Why didn’t I start there? This is another recipe that I’m revisiting. My pickled carrot technique has changed, and I wanted to share the new, simplified version of the recipe. Recipe: Pickled Dill Carrots Adapted from: Judi Kingry and Lauren Devine, Ball Complete Book of Home PreservingCooking time: 10 minutes (more at altitude) Equipment 6 pint canning jars …

Pickled Dill Beans

This week, I’m updating my favorite canning recipes.Late summer vegetables are here! Whoo hoo! My wife devours pickled green beans. I used to make refrigerator pickled dilly beans, but it felt like the jars would be empty before I got them into the refrigerator. I doubled the recipe, then doubled it again, and switched to canning the pickled beans. I finally got ahead of her – the pickled green beans last into the fall. While I was at it, I switched to a recipe without sugar in it. The traditional “Dilly Bean” recipe is just too sweet for me. (And that’s why I’m calling these Pickled Dill Green Beans – they seem closer to dill pickles than dilly beans.) The only problem with this recipe? There’s a lot of chopping to trim five pounds of green beans. I try to sign the rest of the family up for a pickling party…and the kids run for the exits like I set off the smoke alarm. At least Diane is willing to help, with visions of pickled …

Pickled Asparagus With Hot Peppers and Garlic

I’ve become a canner. Last year, I took the plunge, and canned a bunch of vegetables from my CSA. The best part of canning? Learning about all the different things you can pickle. I love pickles; salty, vinegary, sharp, cool and crunchy. A new-found favorite is pickled asparagus. Yes, pickled asparagus sounds weird. I wondered why someone would do that to poor, defenseless asparagus. I mean, you can grill it, saute it, roast it, steam it…why bother pickling it? Two reasons. One, asparagus is perfect for pickles. The vinegar brine is a great counterpoint to the strong taste of the asparagus. The second reason is to stretch out asparagus past its late spring season. I try to buy my food seasonally; if I pickle asparagus, I still have it later in the summer. Asparagus season is so short…why not stretch it out? Now, if canning is not your thing, don’t worry. You can make refrigerator pickled asparagus. Ignore the “process in a water bath” part of the instructions, and store the pickles in the refrigerator. …

Spicy Pickled Carrots

Last year, I made refrigerator pickles from a whole range of CSA and farmer’s market vegetables. I loved having the the pickled peppers and zucchini for a few months after their season was over.*I would have loved the dilly beans, but Diane ate them all before I could get to them. Unfortunately, the pickles started to go after a while – they were only refrigerator pickles. After a few months, the few remaining jars were cloudy, and I figured they were not safe to eat. With a tear in my eye, I had to dump my last two jars of zucchini pickles.* I’ve read that refrigerator pickles are safe for anywhere from three weeks to three months…but not longer than that. This year, I decided to extend my pickle season by truly canning them, so they would be preserved. I started reading up on canning, and found that pickles are good for canning – the brine has a lot of acid, which helps preserve them. I already had most of the equipment – canning jars, a large pot, and a canning …

Zucchini Pickles, Zuni style

As I was finishing up pickle week, I stumbled across this recipe for zucchini pickles from Zuni Cafe in San Francisco.  I’m embarrassed that I didn’t find it earlier.  Zuni is one of my favorite restaurants in the world, and I’ve talked before about how influential the Zuni Cafe Cookbook has been on my cooking.  I’ve also talked about how overrun by zucchini we are this time of year.  But a recipe in the cookbook that I’ve looked through hundreds of times?  Somehow, it managed to elude me. In the spirit of better late than never, here it is.  I like these pickles as much, if not more than, the cucumber pickles I made.  Zucchini is always easier to find than good cucumber pickles, so I will be using this recipe again.*And I love saying “Zuni Zucchini”.  It rolls off the tongue.  Zunicchini.  Yes, my seven year old self is never far from the surface… Sliced and ready to go Recipe: Zucchini Pickles, Zuni styleEquipment: A clean quart jar with a tight fitting lid (Canning jars or …

Pickled Sorta Sour Cucumbers

My brother, Matt (the Doctor!) left these at our cottage this summer. I had a couple on a burger, and then fished a few out of the jar and ate them raw. Then I ate a few more. Then…well, long story short, by the time dinner was done, the pickles were all gone. And I was considering drinking some of the juice left in the jar.*Thanks, Matt! I received a bunch of pickling cucumbers from my CSA, and then I bought some more, to make a jumbo batch of pickles.  I put them in the crisper drawer in my refrigerator, and they sat.  I did all the other pickle recipes for Pickle Week first.  I found, much to my dismay, that cucumbers don’t keep well.  By the time I got to them, all the pickles had turned bad. One batch was furry; the other was slimy. What I have since learned is cucumbers don’t keep well; after 24 hours they start to deteriorate. Make your pickles as soon as you can! This recipe is based …

Pickled Red Onions

Pickled red onions are the one homemade pickle that I have made in the past. They’re a common Mexican side dish, and I’ve often made them to serve with grilled Mexican meals.  Also, I used this recipe to preserve all the small red onions that came out of our garden last year.*That’s something you’ll hear me say a lot this week – pickling is a great way to use the bounty of your garden. We’re getting overrun right now, and pickling is a great way to preserve produce for later in the year. My brother-in-law Travis made some pickled red onions while he was at our summer cottage, and I had them a about a week later on a hamburger. After that, I was putting them on my sandwiches for the rest of the week – they make a great sandwich topping.*Thanks, Travis! This recipe is an based on one from David Lebovitz, who I’ve mentioned before – David is “our man in Paris”. I trust his information on food in the City of Light more than …

Pickled Chile Peppers

Michael Symon and Michael Ruhlman are big names in food circles, but to those of us in Northeastern Ohio, they are hometown boys who made good.*  I was introduced to both of them years ago, when I read an article about Symon, written by Ruhlman, in a local Cleveland magazine. That article became part of Ruhlman’s The Soul of a Chef, the best book about chefs that I’ve read.*We’re a little paranoid around here; whenever someone gets national recognition, their first move is out of Cleveland. When someone decides to stay, even after they’re famous, they hold a special place in our hearts. See Kosar, Bernie. I was excited to read that Ruhlman is co-writing Symon’s first cookbook, Live to Cook. But almost as interesting was the beautiful picture of Symon’s Pickled Chilli Peppers, taken by Ruhlman’s wife, Donna. That picture looks like summer in a jar.*I was a hobbyist photographer for a while, and I am just stunned by the pictures Donna takes for Ruhlman.com. They are some of the most beautiful shots I’ve …

Pickled Dilly Beans

Here is the recipe that started me on my pickling kick: Dilly Beans. This recipe gives you a sweet and dill combination that goes well with the flavor of the beans. I brought my first batch to a friend’s party as an appetizer.* Everyone loved them, but Diane couldn’t keep away from them. We ate the whole quart jar of beans, and Diane ate at least half of them.*Hi, Pam and Dave! Thanks again!I saw this recipe in Cook’s Country magazine, the less uptight, younger sibling of Cook’s Illustrated. It is a good way to use up beans; as you can see in the pictures, I had a lot of beans to use up. I tripled the recipe, and made three quarts of dilly beans.**It’s a week later, and we have a quart and a half left. Did I mention that Diane loves green beans? Recipe: Pickled Dilly Beans Equipment: A clean quart jar with a tight fitting lid (Canning jars or flip top gasket jars are the usual choices.) Ingredients: 1 pound beans, stems …

Basic Technique: Pickling Vegetables

Welcome to pickling week on DadCooksDinner! I’ve been meaning to make some homemade pickles; I make pickled red onions from time to time, and I love them, but I’ve never really branched out into any other recipes.  Then our CSA announced “pick your own” green beans, with no limit.  Diane loves green beans, so she took he kids, and they came back with about five pounds worth.  Oh, and what about those pickle cucumbers I got in the CSA box?  And that gorgeous picture of Michael Symon’s Pickled Chillis on Ruhlman.com?  I was off and running. What I’ve found from this week is that pickling is a great way to save some of the bounty of your garden, CSA or farmer’s market.  If you have an overload of a vegetable, look for a recipe.  You’ll be glad you did.  And it’s easy! I’m doing this pickling mainly for flavor, not long term preserving.  These pickles will only last 2 to 3 months, and they have to be refrigerated.  I could have found recipes for canning …