All posts tagged: pork butt

Rotisserie Pork Shoulder Stuffed with Onions and Parsley (Spiessbraten)

Spiessbraten is German-Brazilian fusion cuisine. Idar-Oberstein was famous for working gemstones into jewelry, especially Agate. But in the late 1700’s, the agate mines were almost played out. It was getting harder and harder to find gems to work with. Then, German immigrants to Brazil found a large deposit of agate. This started a busy trade route. Agate was shipped to Idar-Oberstein and worked into jewelry, then the profits were used to buy goods that were shipped back to Brazil. Along with the agate came the Brazilian tradition of churrasco cooking, spit roasting over an open fire. Idar-Oberstein took the idea of spit roasting and applied it to their favorite local ingredients, pork and onions. The region is famous for this dish; every year, they hold a festival in its honor. Traditionally, spiessbraten is a boned pork neck with a stuffing of onions and herbs. I use a common substitute, pork shoulder, and roll-cut it to open it up like a book. After stuffing it with onions and parsley, I cook it slowly over medium heat …

Slow Cooker Mexican Shredded Pork with Dried Chile Pepper Sauce (Pork Deshebrada)

I’m a food geek. I get enthusiastic about recipes like yakitori chicken skewers, pressure cooker Pho Bo, and rotisserie duck with a pomegranate glaze. But what recipe do my friends and family love? Slow cooker shredded pork. That recipe has a lot of bang for the buck. Toss everything in the slow cooker, come back ten hours later, and you have shredded pork that would fit right in on a Mexican roadside taqueria. Little league baseball is back in season, and my nights are getting hectic. I’ve already made my slow cooker shredded pork a couple of times this season; it is time for something new. This is a riff on mole, the long simmered Mexican sauce. I’m using the slow cooker’s long cooking time to give me the advantages of a mole without all the work. The dried peppers soften in the slow cooker, along with some other aromatics, and I use the defatted pork juices as the liquid in the sauce. A quick whiz in the blender, and I have a complex, sweet, …

Grilled Pork Souvlaki

I’m grilling under a clear, blue sky, with a wispy cloud that looks like a paintbrush dragged across the sky. Most of the trees are bare; one slowpoke is covered with blazing red leaves. It is warm in the sun. Here on the deck, in the shadow of my house, I’m glad I’m wearing a sweatshirt. The wind has a brisk edge. I take a deep breath, enjoying the feel of the cold down in my lungs, the smell of smoke from the grill. Why do people stop grilling after memorial labor day? I know I’m a fanatic. I will grill when ice and snow cover my deck. But today? Today is fifty-five degrees Fahrenheit, and the sun is shining. It’s a perfect, crisp fall day, and I can’t fathom why someone would not fire up the grill. Pork Souvlaki is ideal for fall grilling. Pork shoulder, my favorite, is cut into cubes and marinated in a classic Greek combination of lemon, onion, garlic and and spices. Skewer it and cook it long. Pork shoulder is …

Rotisserie Pork Shoulder with Greek Flavors

I love Greek flavors. What does that mean? To me, it means lemons, garlic, and oregano; cucumbers, feta and thick yogurt. And lots of extra virgin olive oil, preferably from kalamata olives. That’s why I was depressed. I missed Akron’s Greek Festival this year, for the first time in a while. *Why did I miss it? The usual reason – life got in the way. The kids had soccer games, I had to work the weekend, and everyone was fighting a cold. It added up to our missing the spanikopita, dolomades, moussaka, and baklava that I look forward to every year. But then Sunday came, and my depression lifted. We had a clear blue sky with a few puffy clouds for contrast, and a high temperature in the upper sixties. Everything that was getting in the way was complete; we had an evening to relax and enjoy ourselves. *The Cleveland Browns even won a game. It’s a miracle! Time for our own Greek Fest. I made a Greek salad, stuffed with feta, kalamata olives, cucumbers …

Slow Cooker Pork Pot Roast

Slow Cooker Pork Pot Roast

I don’t understand why slow cookers bring out the worst in short cut cooking. It seems like most of the recipes go something like this: Put the meat, a can of cream of mushroom soup, and a package of onion soup mix in the slow cooker. Cook on low for ten hours. Ugh. While this recipe, and I use that phrase loosely, will give you a cooked piece of meat, that’s about all I can say for it. *I’m trying not to get on another rant about cooking with real food. Why, in the name of all that is good in this world, would you use cream of mushroom soup? Why? I like my slow cooker recipes to have a little more finesse. Today I’m making pork pot roast, a winter staple in our household. I make sure I brown the roast and saute the onions before putting them in the slow cooker.  These steps give my pot roast a deep, meaty, caramelized layer of flavor.  Then the slow cooker works its magic, tenderizing the meat …

Rotisserie Pork Shoulder, Char Siu Style

My second most popular post is my rotisserie pork shoulder recipe. *I love that recipe, because it was one of the first recipes I created exclusively for this blog. I was trying to come up with a new rotisserie idea, and it worked out better than I could have hoped.  It has become a standard in my recipe rotation. **Get it? Recipe “rotation”? On the rotisserie? OK, I’ll try again later. I was looking for a follow up, because pork shoulder (aka pork butt) is one of my favorite cuts of meat. I wanted another way to cook it on the rotisserie. When I was researching my Peking duck recipe, the idea came to me. Could I adapt char siu, Chinese barbecued pork, to the rotisserie? The rotisserie turned out* to be a great way to make char siu. You get the sweet, glazed, crispy exterior that says “Chinese barbecue” with the juicy, tender interior that only long cooked pork shoulder can give you. The only trick to the recipe is…sugar burns easily, so you …

Chinese BBQ Boneless Ribs

Pork shoulder (aka Boston Butt, or Pork Butt**) is one of my favorite cuts of meat. I’m particularly fond of using it as “ribs” – which are sold in my local grocery store as “western ribs”, but are really just 2″ thick slices of pork shoulder roast. They cost a LOT less than real ribs do around here – as low as $1.29/lb, where spare ribs never seem to go below $2.19 a pound. When you consider all the extra meat you get out of the western ribs as compared to the spare ribs, it is quite the deal.* *That’s not to say I don’t like real ribs – just not often. At those prices, when so much of what you’re paying for is bone, I can only bring myself to buy them a couple of times a summer. Where did we go wrong? The ribs are supposed to be the cheap cut, the throwaway part that you can get cheap. I guess they got too popular. Sniffle. I’ll be OK, I just need a …