All posts tagged: stock

Slow Cooker Turkey Stock

Thanksgiving night.Exhausted. Too much turkey.Too much wine.Too much stuffing. Ready to collapse. One last thing to do: make turkey stock.Break up turkey carcass to fit in the slow cooker.Add an onion, a carrot, a celery rib, and bay leaves.Cover with cold water.Set cooker on low for 12 hours. Stumble to my bedroom and sleep for 12 hours. Wake up the next morning to the smell of turkey soup. What could be a better way to spend the day after Thanksgiving? Recipe: Slow Cooker Turkey Stock Cooking time: 12 hours Equipment: 6 quart or larger slow cooker (Preferably with a removable insert. I love my All-Clad, but I hear good things about this Crock Pot model.) Ingredients Carcass from a roast turkey, broken into pieces so it will fit in your slow cooker 1 large onion, trimmed and halved 1 large carrot, scrubbed and halved 1 celery rib, halved 2 bay leaves Water to cover (about 4 quarts) Directions 1. Slow cook the stockPut everything in the slow cooker and add the water to cover. Slow …

Slow Cooker Chicken Stock

Homemade chicken stock is kitchen alchemy, turning trash into gold. Take the leftover bones from a roast chicken dinner, add water, and the result is my secret weapon in the kitchen. Stock is the backbone of my soups and pan sauces. I’ve been pressure cooking chicken stock for years; I throw roast chicken carcasses in the pressure cooker pot while cleaning up after dinner. An hour later I’m straining the stock. Quick and easy. My slow cooker is the other way I bend time in the kitchen. Instead of quick and under pressure, there’s long, low and slow. I finally tried slow cooker chicken stock the other day, after reading (yet another) recipe for it in Deborah Schneider’s The Mexican Slow Cooker. After a Sunday roast chicken dinner, I put the chicken bones in the refrigerator overnight. The next morning, everything went in the pot before I left for work. When I came home, the smell of chicken filled the house. I tossed the bones, strained the stock, and threw together a pot of chicken noodle …

Pressure Cooker Turkey Stock Revisited

This post is dedicated to loyal reader Jason. Jason asked me what I thought of this recipe for “Perfect” Pressure Cooker Chicken Stock, from Kyle Connaughton by way of Heston Blumenthal’s test kitchen.Perfect Pressure Cooker Chicken Stock [saveur.com] My initial reaction was mixed. They were not bragging when they said “Perfect”. This is an attempt to make the ultimate stock.  I found myself asking: “Why so fussy?” Why buy specific ingredients to make stock, like chicken wings and ground chicken? My goal with pressure cooker stock is to use things up. I take scraps and leftovers, add a few aromatics, and turn them into a delicious base for future meals. *Making stock feels like culinary sleight of hand. I use scraps that would normally be discarded, and turn them into a stock far better than any of that “broth” they sell in a can at the grocery store. Even though his recipe looked finicky, I was intrigued by Mr. Connaughton’s explanations. Why does a pressure cooker makes such good stock?  Why did he make specific choices …

Pressure Cooker Chicken Stock - adding water to cover

Pressure Cooker Chicken Stock

In Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking, Michael Ruhlman says: Stock is the single preparation that might elevate a home cook’s food from decent to spectacular. I absolutely agree. Stock is flavor, pulled out of leftover bones and meat. With homemade stock, I can make rich and silky pan sauces, gravy with depth, and stews with body. And, of course, soup. The best way to make soup – the *only* way to make soup, in my opinion – is by starting with stock. When I make chicken stock, I use my pressure cooker. Pressure cooker stock is quick…relatively speaing; it takes a few hours, instead of all day. I make chicken stock while I’m cleaning up after a roast chicken dinner. Everything goes in the pot, I fire it up, and then I finish cleaning the kitchen. About an hour later, the stock is done cooking, ready to be strained and refrigerated. Chicken stock seems like culinary magic. You take scraps – chicken pieces that you can’t even eat as leftovers, some vegetables, …

Turkey Stock Shootout

Pressure cooker on the left, stock pot on the right   I’ve been a fan of making my own turkey stock since…well, since my dad would throw the turkey carcass in a big granitware pot the day after thanksgiving, for the makings of turkey soup. I’ve come to agree with Michael Ruhlman’s comments about canned chicken broth.  To sum up: Don’t do that to your food! Make real stock, or use water instead! For a while now, I have been making my own chicken stock.  I roast a couple of chickens once a month or so, and make stock in my pressure cooker.  It’s really good, and much better than Swanson’s low sodium broth. But, recently, Ruhlman threw down the gauntlet: “Because I’ve made a fuss about making your own stock…I figured rather than trying to convince people how easy it is, I should encourage everyone who likes to cook, to make it more difficult and time consuming, and therefore more satisfying and enriching.  Perfect your stock: clarify it.” [ruhlman.com] What?  My pressure cooker stock …

Straining stock

Straining the stock (Adapted from Alton Brown) This is the quick and easy way to strain stock that I learned from my hero, Alton Brown. It makes straining your stock a one-step operation – you are filtering out the big stuff and the little stuff all at once, resulting in a pot full of strained stock. Equipment: Collapsible metal steamer (like This) fine mesh strainer cheesecloth, damp 2 – 3 clothespins (or other clip) 12″ tongs Trivet (or large oven mitt) Oven mitts (or something to keep your hands protected with the hot pot of stock) Ladle (optional, but useful for a very large pot) Largest pot (or pots) you have that aren’t full of stock Ingredients: Pot full of just finished stock See the picture for the setup: Put the pot you’re going to pour into in your sink. Clip the damp cheesecloth into the fine mesh strainer, and put it over the target pot. (Or, if you have one, use a chinoise instead). Put the pot full of stock on the trivet, on …

Turkey Stock done right

Recipe: Ruhlman’s Turkey Stock Done Right(via: Ruhlman.com) Equipment: 12 quart stock pot (or the largest pot you have that you can fit in your oven.) I have this: All-Clad Stainless 12-Quart Multi CookerAnd I want this: All-Clad Stainless-Steel Stockpot – 16 quart Aromatics! Ingredients: Carcass from one turkey, broken into pieces that will fit in your pot 6 quarts cold water (or more to cover) 1 large onion, peeled, trimmed and halved 1 celery rib, cut in half (optional) 1 large carrot, peeled and cut in half (optional) 3 cloves garlic, skin on, crushed (optional) 1 tsp salt 1 tsp whole black peppercorns 1 bay leaf 1 sprig fresh thyme 1 half a bunch of parsley stems (optional – skipped, since I didn’t have them) Turkey! Directions:1. Turn oven to 180*F (or as close as you can get it, if your oven doesn’t go that low). 2. Put carcass in pot, and add the cold water – you want to cover the carcass by 1″ 3. Put pot on high heat, bring to a bare simmer, …

Pressure Cooker Turkey Stock

Recipe: Pressure Cooker Turkey Stock(Inspired by The America’s Test Kitchen Family Cookbook: Pressure Cooker Chicken Stock) Cook time: 60 minutes Equipment: 8 to 10 quart Pressure Cooker (I use this one:Fagor Duo 10-Quart Pressure Cooker/Canner) Aromatics! Ingredients: Carcass from one turkey, broken into pieces that will fit in your pressure cooker 1 large onion, trimmed and halved 1 celery rib, cut in half (optional) 1 large carrot, peeled and cut in half (optional) 3 cloves garlic, skin on, crushed (optional) 1 tsp salt 1 tsp whole black peppercorns 1 bay leaf 1 sprig fresh thyme 1 half a bunch of parsley stems (optional – skipped, since I didn’t have them) 3 quarts cold water (or more to cover) Carcass, broken into pieces Don’t fill your cooker over it’s “max fill line” – I’m probably a little over it here… Directions:1. Put all ingredients in pressure cooker, and add the cold water – you want to cover the ingredients by 1″ 2. Put on the lid, clamp it shut, and bring the PC up to high pressure, …

Turkey Stock for people who aren’t obsessed

Recipe: Turkey Stock for people who aren’t obsessed (AKA, like my Dad used to make*) *Still does, actually… Makes about 6 quarts of stock, but this will vary depending on width your pot, and how much you break up your carcass Equipment: 12 Quart or larger pot (my dad has always used one like this: Granite Ware Stock Pots) Ingredients: Carcass from one turkey, broken into pieces that will fit in your pot (or not broken up at all, if your pot is big enough) 1 large onion, trimmed and halved 1 celery rib, cut in half (optional) 1 large carrot, peeled and cut in half (optional) 1 tsp salt 1 tsp whole black peppercorns (optional) 1 bay leaf 1 sprig fresh thyme, or 1 tbsp dried thyme (optional) 1 half a bunch of parsley stems (optional) Cold water to cover other ingredients Directions: 1. Put all ingredients in granitware pot, and add the cold water – you want to cover the ingredients by one inch. 2. Put pot on high heat, bring to a bare …