Grilling
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Grilled Boneless Pork Chops with Apple Cider Brine and Apple Butter Glaze


This post is sponsored by the National Pork Board and Costco. Celebrate #Porktober with pork at Costco!

As the weather turns crisp and you start gathering around the table with family and friends more frequently, serve something you know they’ll love – tender, juicy pork! And, don’t forget to visit Costco.com for information on weekly discounted fresh pork cuts and everything else you’ll need to celebrate “Porktober”.


Orange and brown leaves skitter past as the wind nips at my ears. Fall is here, and it is apple picking time – and also pork chop time. Back before refrigeration, when seasonal cooking was the only way we could cook, pigs were a fall animal. Of course, that meant pork was paired with apples, a fall fruit.

In this recipe, I’m building on that tradition. I season the pork with an apple cider brine – a very modern technique. The cider adds sweetness and helps the chops brown quickly on the grill. Then, for even more flavor, I brush the pork with an apple butter and mustard glaze.

When I cook boneless chops, I want them thick cut – the thicker, the better. That way, I can sear the outside, and have plenty of time for the chops to finish gently over indirect heat. I prefer my pork chops medium-rare, cooked to 145°F (measured with a digital instant read thermometer in the thickest part), with a three minute rest. The result is tender, juicy, perfectly cooked pork.

Looking for a taste of fall? Enjoy these pork chops with layers of apple flavor.

And, please support today’s sponsor, Costco. They have all the ingredients you need for your fall feast, including a special on boneless pork chops and roasts this week, 10/6 to 10/12. Thank you, Costco!

Recipe: Grilled Boneless Pork Chops with Apple Cider Brine and Apple Butter Glaze


Prep Time: 60 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 thick cut pork chops (1 1/4 inches thick, about 10 ounces per chop)

Apple cider brine pork chops

  • 2 cups apple cider
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt

Apple butter glaze

  • 1/2 cup apple butter
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

Directions

1. Brine the pork chops

Stir the apple cider, water, and kosher salt in a large bowl until the salt dissolves. Submerge the chops in this brine, cover, and refrigerate for one to eight hours.

2. Simmer the glaze

Put the apple butter and mustard in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring often, and simmer until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Set this glaze aside for later.
Note: I simmer the glaze on the grill, in a grill safe pot, while I cook the chops.

3. Set the grill for two zone medium-high heat grilling

Prepare a medium-high heat fire on one side of your grill. On my Weber Summit, I preheat the grill for ten minutes with all the burners set to high. Then I brush the grate clean with my grill brush, turn burners #1 and #2 down to medium-high, and turn off all the other burners.

4. Grill the pork chops

Remove the pork chops from the brine and pat them dry with paper towels. Set the pork chops on the grill over the medium-high heat fire. Grill the chops, with the lid closed as much as possible, until they have browned grill marks on the bottom, about 2 minutes. Flip the chops and grill until they have browned grill marks on the other side, about 2 more minutes. Flip the chops and rotate 90 degrees, and grill until the chops have a browned crosshatch of grill marks, about 2 more minutes. Brush both sides of the chops with the apple butter glaze, then move the chops to the indirect heat side of the grill, crosshatched side up, and close the lid. Cook over indirect heat until the chops reach 145°F in their thickest part for medium-rare, about 10 minutes. (Medium-well is 160°F, about 12 minutes over indirect heat.) Brush the chops with another layer of glaze, then remove to a platter, and let them rest for at least three minutes before serving.

Notes

  • These are big chops. If you have big eaters (like me), one chop per person is good; if you have normal eaters (like my wife and kids), a half a chop per person is a more reasonable serving.
  • I grill an extra chop for leftover lunch; sliced pork chop sandwiches with a little extra apple butter are a great midweek treat.
  • Costco has deals on boneless pork this month – stop in and support today’s sponsor! Costco has a special every week of #Porktober. The deals are:
    • Boneless chops and roasts from 10/6 through 10/12
    • Boneless sirloin tip roast from 10/13 through 10/19
    • Whole boneless loins from 10/20 through 10/26

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Grilled Ribeye Pork Chops with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub
Grilled Thin Pork Chops with Quick Brinerade
Grilled Pork Chops with Bourbon Brine and Baste

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23 Comments

  1. Anonymous says

    Was at Costco today and picked up some boneless pork chops. They were quite thick. While brining sounds good I didn’t have the time. I heavily peppered them, lightl salted and seared them in a hot pan with EVOO. Removed, added a bit of butter then diced shallots, sauté a bit, added cider then returned the pork. Simmered til done. Your brining sounds good, I’ll have to try that. I’m freezing the rest of the chops…

  2. From an anonymous commenter:

    “Was at Costco today and picked up some boneless pork chops. They were quite thick. While brining sounds good I didn’t have the time. I heavily peppered them, lightl salted and seared them in a hot pan with EVOO. Removed, added a bit of butter then diced shallots, sauté a bit, added cider then returned the pork. Simmered til done. Your brining sounds good, I’ll have to try that. I’m freezing the rest of the chops… “

  3. Fran Bell says

    Mike, the glaze ingredients listed are mustard and apple butter but the directions call for apple butter and lemon juice. Is something missing?

  4. Fran, thank you for pointing that out – it’s fixed now. (I originally used lemon juice and mustard, but switched to only mustard…then deleted the wrong ingredient from the instructions.)

  5. Ancilla J. says

    My go to method for grilled pork is to marinate it for a few hours in a west indian seasoning. The seasoning includes a blend of Cilantro, celery, garlic, green onions , thyme, water, salt & pepper. I grill my meat and then chop it up and drizzle fresh seasoning on top.

  6. cezovski says

    My favorite way to cook pork is bone-in pork chops with lots of seasoning!

  7. annalene says

    I love grilling pork chops with a Hawaiian inspired marinade… soy sauce, sugar, ginger, pineapple juice. Love to have a little bit of sweetness there!

  8. Randi Goodies says

    Pork chops butterflied and stuffed with stuffing and grilled until golden brown!

  9. sentssaver says

    I love a marinated pork tenderloin on the grill with veggies!
    stefanie.gladden(at)gmail.com

  10. Linda C says

    My favorite grilled pork– I buy a porketta butt roast and slow-cook it on my rotisserie. Nothing like it!

  11. harleygurl72 says

    I noticed in your picture for the dry rub ingredients you have bay leaves however they are not listed in the text ingredients list. Is it just two bay leaves and how are you using them?

    I want to make this for thanksgiving this year and I am still wondering about the 2 bay leaves?

  12. See my comment in the header text:

    “*You’ll see some bay leaves in the pictures of the dry brine. Ignore them. They’re not really there. These are not the bay leaves you’re looking for. (Waves hand in dismissive manner.)

    **OK, OK, you caught me. I tried to crumble them by hand, and I couldn’t break them up small enough to use in my dry brine. I should have used my spice grinder, but I didn’t want to get it dirty just for the bay leaves, so I left them out. It tasted great without them.”

  13. Steve Johnston says

    I’m curious….. I’ve always been under the impression that you need to wrap the turkey in foil to keep the juices in, until the last hour or so to brown it. I see that this, and most other recipes don’t mention this. Are there any dryness issues from skipping the foil wrap?

  14. Horatio says

    I’ll be making our Xmas turkey following this recipe. Quick question: In your rotisserie chicken recipe you place a good amount of salt/spices UNDER the breast skin. I didn’t see that technique being used here (although I have seen the folks at America’s Test Kitchen do it). Any reason you “sprinkle and rub evenly over the turkey” here rather than following the immensely successful “under-the-skin” technique? Thanks!

  15. David Lewis says

    Wow! I just cooked an 11 lb. turkey on my gas BBQ using your recipe and technique …. I was awesome and many thought that it was the best turkey they had ever eaten.

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