Pressure Cooker Brown Jasmine Rice

Pressure Cooker Brown Jasmine Rice

Pressure Cooker Brown Jasmine Rice

I love food blogging – except when I weigh myself on Monday and Thursday mornings. Years ago I lost a lot of weight by cutting out processed starches and eating only whole grain carbs. That meant a lot of brown rice, because I love my stir fries and curries – they help me slip in a bunch of vegetables with my meat.

There are two problems with brown rice.

Problem one: cooking time. It takes a lot longer to cook brown rice – about an hour on the stovetop. That’s where my pressure cooker comes in; I can have brown rice in about a half an hour.

Problem two: taste. In other words, my kids. They love the neutral taste of white rice. The first time I tried to serve them brown rice, with its strong, nutty flavor, they took one bite, then refused to eat an more. I would try brown rice every now and again, but they never liked it. That is, until I tried brown jasmine rice. The long grains cook up fluffier than most brown rices, and the flavor is close enough to white rice that they don’t mind it as the side dish with a stir fry or curry. I finally have a brown rice I can serve to the kids.

Looking for a nutritious side dish, especially to balance out an Asian meal? Try some brown jasmine rice in the pressure cooker.

Recipe: Pressure Cooker Brown Jasmine Rice

Equipment

 

Pressure Cooker Brown Jasmine Rice

Pressure Cooker Brown Jasmine Rice recipe - Nutritious brown rice, ready in a little over a half an hour in the pressure cooker.

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Ingredients

  • 2 cups brown jasmine rice (Or long grain brown rice, or brown basmati rice)
  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt (1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt)

Directions

  1. Add the rice to the pot: Pour the rice, water, and salt into the pressure cooker pot and stir.
  2. Pressure cook the rice: Lock the lid and cook on high pressure for 20 minutes in an electric PC, or 16 minutes in a stovetop PC. Let pressure come down naturally, about 15 minutes. Fluff the rice with a fork and serve.
Cuisine: American | Recipe Type: Pressure Cooker
https://www.dadcooksdinner.com/pressure-cooker-brown-jasmine-rice/

 

Adding water and rice to the pressure cooker

Adding water and rice to the pressure cooker

 

Fluffed and ready to serve

Fluffed and ready to serve

Notes

  • My favorite brand (so far) is Jasmati brand brown rice from Rice Select, but I have to admit, I don’t have too many choices for brown jasmine rice in my area. If you have a favorite brand, let us know in the comments.

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Pressure Cooker White Rice
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Pressure Cooker Chinese Pork with Dried Plum Sauce
My Pressure Cooker Recipe Index

 

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11 Comments

  1. Chris L /

    Two cups of dry rice to start sounds like it yields a lot by the time it’s done. How long does this cooked rice last in the fridge before it goes bad?

  2. I’ve been using Trader Joe’s brown jasmine rice in my Kuhn stovetop cooker and usually make more than I need for one meal. I pack it in quart Ziploc freezer bags and reheat as needed, or break off just enough to add to a bowl of soup or a salad.

    2 cups rice to a scant 2 3/4 cups broth or water (or a combination), depending on the entree. Plus 1 to 2 tablespoons butter to reduce foaming and for flavor + 2 teaspoons Diamond Crystal kosher salt. I cook it on high pressure for 23 minutes and allow the pressure to come down naturally, about 7 to 10 minutes. This makes about 5 cups of cooked rice.

    Maybe the timing is the difference in brands or that we just prefer our brown rice a little softer, like white rice. Note that my rice kernels remain whole and are not “blown.”

    I should try it in my Cuisinart digital cooker but since digitals take more time from start to finish than stovetops do, I’m usually too pressed for time to do so. One day. OK. I’ll try it this evening if I can find counter space for “Tubby.”

  3. I forgot to mention that after the pressure release I put a clean folded towel on the top of the cooker and rest the lid on top of it to absorb steam and let it stand until I’m ready to serve. Which now makes me wonder if I’m using a little too much water to begin with.

  4. Sigrid Trombley /

    Mike, have you also tried brown basmati rice and if so, how would you compare the difference in taste between the brown basmati and the brown jasmine?

  5. Vicky /

    If I’m using the IP, do I set it to “rice” or just set it manually?

  6. Jennifer /

    Does short grain brown rice work? Would I need to adjust time or water amount?
    Thanks for your easy to follow recipes!

    • You shouldn’t have to adjust the recipe – it should work with most types of brown rice (short, medium, and long grain.)

  7. I recently bought some brown jasmine rice at Trader Joe’s and was looking for suggestions on cooking it in the Instant Pot .. Thanks for this post … It’s very helpful.

    As for leftover rice, I always put it in ziploc bags and freeze it. When I’m ready to use it, let it thaw or just break it up until you can get it out of the bags; place in microwave safe bowl and cover with damp paper towel to steam it in the microwave. Just a minute or two will have it steaming hot again without overcooking it.

  8. Gretchen /

    Thanks for this. I cooked long grain brown rice in my Instant Pot using your instructions and it turned out perfectly. I let the pressure come down naturally for about 15 minutes and then (after checking to make sure it was done) left it on warm for a couple of hours before we ate it. It maintained a nice texture. I prefer long grain rice more on the dry side, with separated grains, and this ratio / timing worked perfectly.

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