Pressure cooker, Side dish
comments 2

Instant Pot Yellow Eye Beans

A bowl of cooked yellow eye beans on a wood table with an Instant Pot and some uncooked beans in the background
Instant Pot Yellow Eye Beans

Instant Pot Yellow Eye Beans. Dried beans, ready in about an hour without soaking, thanks to pressure cooking.

Yellow Eye Beans, with their brown spots, remind me of a pinto1, like the spots on black-eyed peas remind me of a Holstein cow. That said, yellow eye beans are not a black-eyed pea variation; they are closer to Navy beans, and are often used in New England Baked Beans recipes.

These Yellow Eye beans came in my Rancho Gordo bean box, so I’m going to make of a pot of beans with garlic and onion. Of course, the pot is an Instant Pot – I pressure cook all my beans. Also, I don’t soak Yellow Eye beans before cooking. They just need to be sorted and rinsed. They pressure cook quickly enough that I don’t bother with the soaking.

Looking for creamy, mild beans with hint of garlic? Try a pot of yellow eye beans.

Recipe: Instant Pot Yellow Eye Beans

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A bowl of cooked yellow eye beans on a wood table with an Instant Pot and some uncooked beans in the background

Instant Pot Yellow Eye Beans


  • Author: Mike Vrobel
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes
  • Total Time: 55 minutes
  • Yield: 6 cups of beans 1x

Description

Instant Pot Yellow Eye Beans. Dried beans, ready in about an hour without soaking, thanks to pressure cooking.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 pound dried Yellow Eye beans, sorted and rinsed
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 onion, peeled and halved
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 6 cups water

Instructions

  1. Sort and rinse the beans: Sort the yellow eye beans, removing any broken beans, stones, and dirt clods. Put the beans in a strainer and rinse under running water.
  2. Pressure cook the beans for 30 minutes with a Quick Release: Put the beans in the pressure cooker, sprinkle with the salt, and set the onion and garlic on top. Pour in the 6 cups of water, stir, and then lock the pressure cooker lid. Cook on high pressure for 30 minutes in an electric pressure cooker, or 25 minutes in a stovetop PC, then quick release the pressure.
  3. Serve: Remove the pressure cooker lid – open it away from you to protect yourself from the hot steam. Discard the onions and garlic cloves. (The garlic cloves may have dissolved into the broth – it’s OK if you can’t find them.) Serve with the broth and enjoy, or transfer the beans to 2-cup containers, cover with broth, and freeze for up to 6 months.

Notes

  • Soaked the beans overnight? Reduce the cooking time to 15 minutes at high pressure with a quick release.

Tools

  • Category: Side Dish
  • Method: Pressure Cooker
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: Instant Pot Yellow Eye Beans, Pressure Cooker Yellow Eye Beans

A bowl of uncooked yellow eye beans on a slate table
Instant Pot Yellow Eye Beans – before cooking

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Instant Pot Small Red Beans (Domingo Rojo Beans)
Instant Pot Royal Corona Beans
Pressure Cooker Vaquero Beans in Broth
My other Instant Pot Pressure Cooker Recipes

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Filed under: Pressure cooker, Side dish

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Hi! I’m Mike Vrobel. I’m a dad and an enthusiastic home cook; an indie cookbook author and food blogger with a day job, a patient spouse, and three kids who would rather have hamburgers for dinner.

2 Comments

  1. Eric J Wolff says

    Thanks for defining what yellow-eyed beans are. I’m not a fan of black-eyed peas unless they’re on their own as a side dish. I’ve got a bag of yellow-eyed beans that I was given a while back and I was wondering if they’re make a good bean soup. Your comment about them being more like Navy Beans than black-eyed peas answered my question–YES! They will make good soup.

    I really enjoy your blog. You’re one of the few bloggers who’s recipes I know I can trust. Thanks for all your efforts.

    -Eric.

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