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Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast

Pressure Cooker Pot Roast | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pot Roast

Fall is here, and I have a taste for pot roast. Time to convert one of my slow cooker recipes to pressure cooking.

Pork shoulder is one of my favorite cuts of meat, especially for pressure cooking. It is meant to be cooked long, low, and slow…but we’re going to cheat by applying pressure. We’ll still get melt-in-your-mouth pork roast, but it will only take a couple of hours, end to end.

This recipe will look familiar to you if you follow this blog – it’s my “fall pork” flavor profile. Apples and thyme, onions and garlic, a little hard cider (or regular cider) and some carrots. The only trick is cutting the roast in half before pressure cooking. Even in a pressure cooker, it takes time for heat to penetrate into the middle of a large pork shoulder, so we’re speeding things up by breaking it into two smaller pieces.

Looking for a perfect pork pot roast from the pressure cooker? Look no further.

Video: Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast (2:11)

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast YouTube.com

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Pressure Cooker Pot Roast | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast


  • Author: Mike Vrobel
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 40 minutes
  • Yield: 6-8 servings 1x

Description

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast. Tender pot roasted pork – ready in a few hours, thanks to the pressure cooker.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 3- to 5-pound pork shoulder roast (aka Boston butt roast) cut in half
  • 1 ½ teaspoons fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 large onion, peeled and diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 15-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 cup hard cider (or apple cider, or chicken stock, or water)
  • 1 pound baby carrots (or 1 pound carrots, peeled and cut into 1″ chunks)
  • 1 apple, peeled, cored, and cut into slices


Instructions

  1. Season and sear the roast: Cut the pork shoulder roast in half, then sprinkle with 1 ½ teaspoons salt and ½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper. Heat 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. (Use “Sauté” mode adjusted to high in an electric pressure cooker.) Sear the pork roast one piece at a time. Sear each piece on 2 sides – use the largest sides – until it is well browned, about 4 minutes a side. After searing, put the pork in a bowl and save for later.
  2. Sauté the aromatics: Add the onion and garlic to the pressure cooker pot, sprinkle with the thyme and coriander, and sauté, stirring and scraping the browned pork bits from the bottom of the pan. Sauté until the onion softens, about 5 minutes. Pour in the hard cider, bring to a simmer, and simmer for 1 minute to boil off some of the alcohol.
  3. Everything in the pot:Add the pork into the pot, and pour in any juices in the bowl. Add the diced tomatoes, carrots, and sliced apple on top of the pork.
  4. Pressure cook the pot roast for 50 minutes with a natural pressure release: Lock the pressure cooker lid and cook at high pressure for 50 minutes in an electric PC, or 45 minutes in a stovetop PC. Let the pressure come down naturally, about 20 more minutes.
  5. Defat the sauce, carve the roast, and serve: Gently move the pieces of pork to a carving board with tongs or a slotted spoon. (Or both – the pork is fall apart tender at this point.) Scoop the vegetables into a serving bowl with a slotted spoon. Pour the remaining liquid in the pot into a fat separator. Carve the roast, cutting it against the grain into ½” thick slices. Sprinkle some salt over the sliced roast, then pour a little of the defatted sauce over it. Serve, passing the rest of the sauce and the vegetables on the side.

Notes

Serve this with is mashed potatoes, to help soak up the sauce. (Or crusty bread – another good sauce dipping option.)

Tools

  • Category: Sunday Dinner
  • Method: Pressure Cooker
  • Cuisine: American
Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast - step by step tower image | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Pressure Cooker Beef Pot Roast
Slow Cooker Pork Pot Roast
Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard

My other Pressure Cooker Recipes
My other Pressure Cooker Time Lapse Videos

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4 Comments

    • Lysandra, Three options:
      1. Skip the defatting step.
      2. Pour the sauce into a large measuring cup, let it settle, and the fat will float to the top. Spoon off as much of the top layer of fat as you can.
      3. (The best option – even better than a fat separator – but you have to plan ahead): After cooking, take the inner pot out of the pressure cooker base, set it aside, and let it cool for an hour. Then, move it into the refrigerator overnight. (It helps to have the non-pressure lid to put on the pot.) The next day, there will be a cap of fat on top; scrape off as much as you can, then put the liner pot back in the pressure cooker, set to saute, and reheat until simmering. Continue with the “remove roast and scoop out vegetables” step, then just pour the sauce into a container.

      • Bill Erwin says

        Mike, a really great receipt, followed your instructions to the letter, which is unusual for me. This meal will be served often in our home. Thanks

  1. Betsy says

    My husband and I loved this recipe – can’t wait to share with my adult children when they visit. I spooned off the fat and used a measuring cup to separate the fat so I could return juice to pot. I only had apple juice so I used that – next time will use cider. Thanks for a great recipe!

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