All posts tagged: lamb

Sous Vide Rack of Lamb with Dijon Bread Crumb Crust

I love the way sous vide cooks meat to medium-rare. If I want to cook to a warm pink interior, sous vide is now my default technique. This is a big deal for me; a few years ago, I thought of sous vide as crazy molecular gastronomy, something a mad scientist chef would use. It was out of the range of home chefs, even ones as adventurous as me. At the same time, I would sit over my grill, watching, poking, taking temperatures, and hoping that I wasn’t overcooking my steaks. My mom wants her meat cooked rare. Someone described it as: “if the steak gets immediate medical attention, we can save it.” That’s how my mom wants it cooked. It hurts when I cook her a steak…and she cuts into it, and it is more pink than red (or, even worse, more gray than pink). She puts on a brave face on, and acts like it’s OK…but I know, oh yes, I know. How things have changed in those few short years. Thanks to …

Sous Vide Grilled Lamb T-Bones with Provencal Tian

  Shameless plug alert: This recipe is my entry in the SousVide Supreme Summer Blogger BBQ Challenge. Please go vote for me – if I win the fan favorite voting, I get to keep the SousVide Supreme. Otherwise, I’ll have to send it back, and I’ll be sad to see it go. There’s something in it for you, too, (beyond not listening to me whine: “I could have been a contender.”) If you vote, you’re entered in a drawing for a $200 gift certificate from SousVide Supreme. So, get over there and vote! …UPDATE: Whoops. They linked to my 48 hour short ribs recipe, not this one. My fault, and they’re trying to fix it. Until they do, please vote for my 48 hour short ribs. Thanks!Lamb on the grill takes me back to Provence. I spent a week, taking cooking classes and exploring hill towns, the rolling vineyards, the heat of a Provencal summer… …oh, wait, my memory’s getting carried away. I was there in March. A chilly wind was blowing, and I spent …

Beer Cooler Sous Vide Grilled Rack of Lamb

I am obsessed with Kenji Alt’s Beer Cooler Sous Vide Hack, using a cooler full of hot water to cook meat to a perfect medium-rare. In the last two months I’ve used it on strip loin steaks, tri-tip, thick-cut pork chops and top sirloin roasts. *The only disappointing result has been pork chops. They were good, but they weren’t noticeably better than regular pork chops. My favorite reaction was from my mom, who is passionate about medium-rare beef. On her birthday, as I lugged a cooler full of hot water and top sirloin roasts into her house, I explained sous vide cooking. She didn’t get it. I tried again; it still wasn’t making sense to her. I pulled the roasts out of their baggies, and gave them a quick sear on the grill. Mom was grabbing pieces off the cutting board as fast as I could slice them. “Michael,” she said, “I still don’t understand it works, but this is perfectly cooked.” I felt like The Good Son. For Easter, I tried my new favorite …

Lamb Shanks with Tomatoes and White Beans

It has been cool here in Copley; summer is ending, and the wind is carrying a hint of fall. That’s why, when I was paging through Pam Anderson’s Perfect One-Dish Dinners, this recipe jumped out at me as the one that I had to make. Lamb shanks with white beans and tomatoes screams “fall comfort meal” to me, and it seemed like the ideal recipe to start with in my review of Pam’s book. As usual, Pam has the recipe dialed in – she has it just as simple as it can be, and no simpler. The recipe is straightforward without being overly simplistic. The lamb is tender and falling apart, like a good braised lamb should be. Her technique of braising in a high-heat oven, with a foil wrapped pan worked well. *I had to cook the lamb a bit longer than Pam recommended to get it truly fork tender. That seems to happen to me with a lot of published recipes, from a variety of sources. I wonder if my oven is running a little …

Grilled Lamb Loin Chops, Michael Symon Style

Michael Symon on grilling:  “Leave it alone! Stop messing with it! My friends do this…” *He dances his tongs around on the grill like he’s Erroll Flynn in a pirate movie. Here is what I tell them. Put it on the grill. Let it sear while you drink a beer. Flip it, then drink another beer. You’re done. You don’t need to constantly be flipping or turning. You know why they grill that crosshatch pattern at Ponderosa, right? Cue his maniacal laughter. *If you’ve ever been to his restaraunts, or watched him on TV, you know that laugh. It’s a kick, hearing it in person. Lamb loin chops (aka Lamb T-Bones, as Michael calls them) are a slightly more economical cut than rack of lamb. You don’t get the same wonderful “lamb popsicle” look that you get from a rack of lamb. But you get more lamb for your dollar, and lamb loin is every bit as tender and flavorful as the rack of lamb. Recipe: Grilled Lamb Loin Chops, Michel Symon Style Cook time: …

Rotisserie Lamb Shoulder

I’m a fan of shoulder cuts of meat, like beef chuck and pork butt. Lamb shoulder is another of my favorites, but it can be harder to find in my local grocery stores. It is worth the effort to hunt down. Lamb shoulder gives you all the advantages of shoulder cuts; it is tough to overcook, well marbled with fat, and has lots of connective tissue that melts into tender gelatin, if it is cooked long enough  As a bonus, lamb shoulder is cheaper than the “better” cuts from the loin and leg, but still gives you the distinctive flavor of lamb. Luckily, I have a source for my lamb shoulder.  I put in a special order for a boned and tied lamb shoulder roast from the Great American Lamb company, and picked it up at the Cuyahoga Valley Winter Farmer’s Market last month. *Don’t be afraid to talk to your butcher!  They are happy to special order cuts like this, as long as they have some advance notice.  It will also show your butcher …

Rotisserie Leg of Lamb Provencal

This week I’m sharing recipes inspired by my trip to the winter farmer’s market in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. I had a pleasant surprise at the market: locally grown lamb from the Great American Lamb Company. I bought a 5 pound bone in lamb leg. Then came the fun part: when I got it home, I had to figure out what to do with it! I decided to cook it with my rotisserie.* I’ve already posted recipes for rotisserie lamb leg Greek and Moroccan style. I needed to come up with something different. *I know you’re shocked, SHOCKED to hear I’m cooking it on the rotisserie. What other leg of lamb recipes are there? Why, leg of lamb Provencal, of course! *Have I mentioned that I spent a week at a cooking class in Provence? Not recently? Don’t worry, I have a series of posts from those classes coming, so you’ll get to hear all about it. Again. I went to my cookbooks for inspiration. A few of the recipes wanted me to poke holes in the lamb …

Rotisserie Boneless Leg of Lamb Roast with Greek Brinerade

There’s a debate in the food science community over the usefulness of marinades.  They’re very traditional, but all the evidence points towards two things: 1. They don’t penetrate into the meat AT ALL. The flavor they give is stuck on the surface. 2. If they’re too acidic, they turn the surface of the meat to mush My twin heroes of food science,  Cook’s Illustrated and Alton Brown have both recently weighed in on the topic.  If you can catch Alton’s recent episode, “Tender is the Pork“,  you can see his take on it.* *He illustrates the debate in the food community by having a couple of guys in lab coats slap fighting.  Yes, it’s juvenile.  I laughed, and laughed, and laughed… Cooks Illustrated is referring to it as “Don’t Marinate – Brinerate” (subscription required).  They up the amount of salt in the marinade, causing it to work as a brine, which does draw flavors into the meat.  They also keep their marinating times short, and limit the amount of acid in the mix, so the surface …

Grilled Rack of Lamb

I like to gnaw on bones. This shouldn’t come as a surprise to you, if you’ve been reading this blog for a while. (Say, here, here or here.) I think rack of lamb is the perfect meal for that – you get a little lamb popsicle, with the bone as the handle.* *If you’re a vegetarian who has stumbled on to my site, you have my sympathy. This is not the post for you. Try this one instead. Recipe: Grilled Rack of Lamb Equipment: Grill (I used a Weber Summit 650. Here it is.) Ingredients: 1 Rack of Lamb (I bought Trader Joe’s frozen, pre-seasoned rack of lamb, and thawed it in the refrigerator) 1/2 tsp Kosher Salt 1/2 tsp Pepper, freshly ground Directions: 1. Prep lamb: One hour before cooking, remove lamb from packaging, and pat dry. Sprinkle evenly with salt and pepper, and let rest at room temperature. 2. Prep grill: Preheat grill, and set up for indirect-high heat cooking. (See step 2 here for instructions for different grills.) For my grill, this …