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Pressure Cooker Chinese Kale | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Chinese Kale

Pressure Cooker Chinese Kale | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Chinese Kale

I was checking out our new Whole Foods 365 store, and saw bunches of kale on sale for 50 cents. Sale kale? Pressure cooker time!

I know, I know, “Whole Paycheck”…but I always like having another option for good ingredients. And, as I’ve said before, if you want good vegetables, go to a store that caters to vegetarians. (And, I was pleasantly surprised by how low the prices are. Not sure if it’s the Whole Foods 365 concept, or the Amazon.com influence, but the prices seemed reasonable.)

This is my pressure cooker kale basic technique by way of China. Or, at least Chinese-American. It is inspired by the plates of steamed Chinese vegetables I order at dim sum restaurants. (I need a little something green to counteract all the steamed dumplings and sticky buns.)

If there’s a trick to this recipe, it’s trimming the kale, and cutting out the thick inner stem. That prep work takes as long as the rest of the recipe. When I’m in a hurry – and the kale sale is over – I will cheat and buy bags of pre-washed, pre-trimmed kale. Hey, sometimes you just need an easy green side dish, you know?

Pressure Cooker Chinese Kale [YouTube.com]

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Pressure Cooker Chinese Kale | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Chinese Kale


  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 20 minutes
  • Yield: 4-6 servings
  • Category: Side dish
  • Method: Pressure Cooker
  • Cuisine: Chinese

Description

Pressure Cooker Chinese Kale. A quick green side dish from the pressure cooker.


Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon peanut oil (or vegetable oil)
  • 3 cloves garlic, sliced thin
  • 1/2 inch slice of ginger, peeled and crushed
  • 1 scallion (green onion), trimmed and sliced things
  • 1 pound kale, cleaned and stems trimmed
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt (or Sichuan Roasted Pepper Salt)
  • 1/2 cup water (or the minimum amount for your cooker)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

Instructions

 

  1. Lightly sauté the garlic, ginger, and scallion, then add the kale: Pour the oil into the bottom of the pressure cooker pot, and add the garlic, ginger, and scallion to the cold pan. Then turn on sauté mode in an electric PC or set the pot over medium heat in a stovetop PC. (Starting with a cold pan helps toast the garlic without burning it.) Heat until the garlic just starts to sizzle – we want it to bubble around the edges, but not brown – about 3 minutes. Stir a big handful of the kale, tossing to coat with the garlicky oil, then start packing in the rest of the kale. Don’t worry about the max fill line on the cooker – it will wilt quickly – but you need to pack it in enough to close the lid. Sprinkle the kale with the 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt, then pour the water over the top of everything.
  2. Pressure cook the kale for 5 minutes with a quick release: Lock the lid on the pressure cooker, bring it up to high pressure, and cook at high pressure for 5 minutes (for either electric or stovetop PC). Quick release the pressure. Remove the lid carefully – the steam is hot enough to scald.
  3. Season and serve: Drizzle the soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sesame oil over the kale in the pot, and toss to coat. Scoop the kale out of the pot with a slotted spoon or tongs, leaving as much liquid behind as possible. Serve.

Notes

Don’t feel like trimming kale? Get a bag of pre-washed and trimmed kale. Look near the bagged salads. It won’t be as fresh as the bunches of kale…but sometimes perfect is the enemy of good enough.

Tools

  • This recipe fits in a 6 quart or larger pressure cooker. (I love my 6 quart Instant Pot)
  • Tongs are my hands in the kitchen. They are the right tool for tossing and packing the kale in the pot, and then for scooping out the kale and leaving the excess liquid behind.

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Pressure Cooker Chinese Ribs
Pressure Cooker Baby Bok Choy
Pressure Cooker Chinese Pepper Steak
My other Pressure Cooker Recipes

My other Pressure Cooker Time Lapse Videos

Enjoyed this post? Want to help out DadCooksDinner? Subscribe to DadCooksDinner via eMail and share this post with your friends. Want to contribute directly? Donate to my Tip Jar, or buy something from Amazon.com through the links on this site. Thank you.

Grilled Short Ribs with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub | DadCooksDinner.com

Grilled Short Ribs with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub

Grilled Short Ribs with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub | DadCooksDinner.com

Grilled Short Ribs with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub


Thank you to my friends at Certified Angus Beef® Brand for sponsoring DadCooksDinner. Please check them out at hashtag #BestBeef for more beef recipes, and visit them at the Certified Angus Beef Kitchen Community on Facebook. Thank you!


 

I’m a sucker for short ribs. I saw these beauties in the meat case at my local grocery store – flanken cut beef short ribs, lined up in their trays – and I had to buy them. Had to, I tell you!

Flanken style short ribs are the style popularized in Korean grilling, cut across the bone, about 1/4 inch thick. I wasn’t in the mood for Korean, though; We had stir fry for dinner last night. I had a taste for something a little more American, so I went with… Smoked Spanish Paprika rub. (Yes, I know, not very American. Oh, well.)

What does Flanken mean, anyhow? It’s derived from the Yiddish and German word for “flank”, because the ribs are cut from the flank of a side of beef. Flanken was a cheap cut, because it is tough and chewy; normally it takes long, slow cooking to tenderize it. Don’t use thick cut short ribs for this; save them for braises or barbecue. But cut the short ribs thin enough, and they become perfect for grilling, with a big beefy taste.

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Grilled Short Ribs with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub | DadCooksDinner.com

Grilled Short Ribs with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub


  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 8 minutes
  • Total Time: 23 minutes
  • Yield: 3 pounds of ribs
  • Category: Weeknight Dinner
  • Method: Grilling
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Grilled Short Ribs with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub. Thin cut flanken style short ribs on the grill with a quick, easy spice rub.


Ingredients

  • 3 pounds flanken-style short ribs (short ribs cut about 1/4-inch thick across the bones)

Spice Rub

  • 1 tablespoon smoked Spanish paprika
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper


Instructions

  1. Sprinkle the ribs with the spice rub: Mix the spice rub ingredients until they are completely combined. Sprinkle the ribs with the rub until they are completely coated. (You may have some leftover rub – save it in a jar and use it next time.) Let the short ribs rest at room temperature while the grill preheats.
  2. Preheat the grill for direct medium heat: Preheat grill for direct cooking over medium heat.▪ Gas grill: Preheat on high for 10 minutes, clean the grill grates with a grill brush, then turn the heat down to medium.▪ Charcoal grill: Light the coals and wait for them to be covered with gray ash. Spread in a single layer of coals over the charcoal grate. Put the grill grate on the grill, and clean with a grill brush.
  3. Cook ribs for 4 minutes a side: Set the short ribs on the grill over direct heat, and cook for about 4 minutes a side, until they are well browned. (I flip the short ribs in a 2-2-2-2 pattern. 2 minutes, flip, 2 minutes, flip and rotate 90 degrees to get a crosshatch of grill marks, 2 minutes, flip (still rotated), 2 minutes.) Remove ribs to a plate and let rest for 10 minutes before serving.

Notes

Short ribs are so thin that “doneness” doesn’t really come in to play. That’s fine; short ribs are all about the crispy, spicy crust, and big beefy taste. Cook them until they’re well browned and don’t worry about medium-rare.

Tools

  • A grill (I love my massive Weber Summit grill, but it is probably overkill for this recipe. I use the extra space for some side dishes.)
  • Tongs are my hands on the grill

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Korean Grilled Short Ribs (Kalbi)
Grilled Mexican Short Rib Tacos
BBQ Beef Short Ribs on a Kettle Grill
My list of Grilling Recipes


One week left in my T-Shirt sale!

The DadCooksDinner limited edition t-shirt is available through Thursday, September 29th at 11PM. If you want one, don’t forget to order!

Click here to check them out. [Teespring.com]


Enjoyed this post? Want to help out DadCooksDinner? Subscribe to DadCooksDinner via eMail and share this post with your friends. Want to contribute directly? Donate to my Tip Jar, or buy something from Amazon.com through the links on this site. Thank you.

Grilled Short Ribs with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub Tower - Seasoning ribs on the bottom, grilling ribs on the top

Grilled Short Ribs with Smoked Spanish Paprika Rub

Pressure Cooker Pot Roast | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast

Pressure Cooker Pot Roast | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pot Roast

Fall is here, and I have a taste for pot roast. Time to convert one of my slow cooker recipes to pressure cooking.

Pork shoulder is one of my favorite cuts of meat, especially for pressure cooking. It is meant to be cooked long, low, and slow…but we’re going to cheat by applying pressure. We’ll still get melt-in-your-mouth pork roast, but it will only take a couple of hours, end to end.

This recipe will look familiar to you if you follow this blog – it’s my “fall pork” flavor profile. Apples and thyme, onions and garlic, a little hard cider (or regular cider) and some carrots. The only trick is cutting the roast in half before pressure cooking. Even in a pressure cooker, it takes time for heat to penetrate into the middle of a large pork shoulder, so we’re speeding things up by breaking it into two smaller pieces.

Looking for a perfect pork pot roast from the pressure cooker? Look no further.

Video: Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast (2:11)

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast YouTube.com

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Pressure Cooker Pot Roast | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast


  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 40 minutes
  • Yield: 6-8 servings
  • Category: Sunday Dinner
  • Method: Pressure Cooker
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast. Tender pot roasted pork – ready in a few hours, thanks to the pressure cooker.


Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 3- to 5-pound pork shoulder roast (aka Boston butt roast) cut in half
  • 1 ½ teaspoons fine sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 large onion, peeled and diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 15-ounce can diced tomatoes
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 cup hard cider (or apple cider, or chicken stock, or water)
  • 1 pound baby carrots (or 1 pound carrots, peeled and cut into 1″ chunks)
  • 1 apple, peeled, cored, and cut into slices


Instructions

  1. Season and sear the roast: Cut the pork shoulder roast in half, then sprinkle with 1 ½ teaspoons salt and ½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper. Heat 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. (Use “Sauté” mode adjusted to high in an electric pressure cooker.) Sear the pork roast one piece at a time. Sear each piece on 2 sides – use the largest sides – until it is well browned, about 4 minutes a side. After searing, put the pork in a bowl and save for later.
  2. Sauté the aromatics: Add the onion and garlic to the pressure cooker pot, sprinkle with the thyme and coriander, and sauté, stirring and scraping the browned pork bits from the bottom of the pan. Sauté until the onion softens, about 5 minutes. Pour in the hard cider, bring to a simmer, and simmer for 1 minute to boil off some of the alcohol.
  3. Everything in the pot:Add the pork into the pot, and pour in any juices in the bowl. Add the diced tomatoes, carrots, and sliced apple on top of the pork.
  4. Pressure cook the pot roast for 50 minutes with a natural pressure release: Lock the pressure cooker lid and cook at high pressure for 50 minutes in an electric PC, or 45 minutes in a stovetop PC. Let the pressure come down naturally, about 20 more minutes.
  5. Defat the sauce, carve the roast, and serve: Gently move the pieces of pork to a carving board with tongs or a slotted spoon. (Or both – the pork is fall apart tender at this point.) Scoop the vegetables into a serving bowl with a slotted spoon. Pour the remaining liquid in the pot into a fat separator. Carve the roast, cutting it against the grain into ½” thick slices. Sprinkle some salt over the sliced roast, then pour a little of the defatted sauce over it. Serve, passing the rest of the sauce and the vegetables on the side.

Notes

Serve this with is mashed potatoes, to help soak up the sauce. (Or crusty bread – another good sauce dipping option.)

Tools

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast - step by step tower image | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pork Pot Roast

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Pressure Cooker Beef Pot Roast
Slow Cooker Pork Pot Roast
Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard

My other Pressure Cooker Recipes
My other Pressure Cooker Time Lapse Videos

Enjoyed this post? Want to help out DadCooksDinner? Subscribe to DadCooksDinner via eMail and share this post with your friends. Want to contribute directly? Donate to my Tip Jar, or buy something from Amazon.com through the links on this site. Thank you.

DadCooksDinner T-Shirt in Black | DadCooksDinner.com

The New Theme Is Here! (And…T-Shirts!)

DadCooksDinner T-Shirt in Black | DadCooksDinner.com

As you probably noticed, my new theme went live! Thanks to Jasmine and Chris at RXVP, I have a new design, logo, and color scheme.

We’re still cleaning up the details and a few messes. (I apologize about the weird right-shift on Tuesday’s email – that should be fixed. And, if you were looking for last week’s Thermoworks Smoke Gateway writeup, it is back online.)

In honor of my new look, I’m trying something new – blog swag – a limited edition run of t-shirts and coffee mugs. Want to proudly display your love of DadCooksDinner, and my new Pressure Cooker icon? You can order from my Teespring storefront:

https://teespring.com/stores/dadcooksdinner [Teespring.com]

Men’s t-shirts are available in black and white, Women’s t-shirts are in black and purple, and the coffee mugs are in black and white.

If you want one, don’t delay – they are only on sale for two weeks. The sale ends September 29 at 11PM EST. And, yes, I am mainly doing this to get my own t-shirt and mug. If you order one, you’re supporting my writing here at DadCooksDinner.

(Wait…one? One or more…buy more! Buy them for friends, family…strangers walking by on the street… Sigh. I’m bad at this marketing stuff.)

If the sales go well, I’ll be doing more shirts in the future, with different designs and some of my other icons. 1

Thanks again for supporting DadCooksDinner!

 

Pressure Cooker Thai Yellow Curry with Chicken | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Thai Yellow Curry with Chicken

Pressure Cooker Thai Yellow Curry with Chicken | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Thai Yellow Curry with Chicken

Extra coconut cream. Mmmmm.

Continuing on my series of pressure cooker Thai Curries, it’s time for yellow curry. Yellow curry is sweeter than other Thai curries – it has extra coconut cream in the cooking. (And, If you’re suspicious that I’m just working my way along the Thai curry shelf at my local Asian market, you’re right. Yellow was next.)

As much as I love dark meat chicken, I went with chicken breast in this curry. Yellow curry usually has potatoes in it, and I didn’t want to overcook them. (And the kids were asking for chicken breast instead of thighs. I went wrong somewhere in my parenting.)

Other than that, this is a pretty standard Thai curry from my pressure cooker:

  • Soften the aromatics (onions, peppers, garlic, and ginger)
  • Fry the coconut cream and curry paste
  • Stir in the coconut milk and main ingredient (chicken, potatoes)
  • Pressure cook, then quick release
  • Stir in the tender vegetables (zucchini) and simmer until done

The kids were big fans of this curry – it’s not as hot as other Thai curries, which made it a big hit with the heat-sensitive kids in the family. (Though they did eat around the zucchini.) Looking for a mild curry to bring in the doubters in your family? Try a yellow curry.

Video: Pressure Cooker Thai Yellow Curry with Chicken (2:31)

Pressure Cooker Thai Yellow Curry with Chicken – Time Lapse YouTube.com

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Pressure Cooker Thai Yellow Curry with Chicken | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Thai Yellow Curry with Chicken


  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6-8 servings
  • Category: Weeknight Dinner
  • Method: Pressure Cooker
  • Cuisine: Thai

Description

Pressure Cooker Thai Yellow Curry with Chicken. A quick weeknight curry, sweetened with a lot of coconut cream and spiced up with Thai yellow curry paste.


Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 medium onion, peeled, and sliced thin
  • 2 medium red bell peppers, trimmed, seeded, and cut into thin strips
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 inch piece of ginger, peeled and crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • Cream from the top of 2 (13.5 ounce) cans coconut milk
  • 4 tablespoons yellow curry paste (a whole 4 oz can)
  • 3 pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1 inch cubes
  • 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 1/2 pounds Petite Yukon Gold potatoes, quartered
  • The liquid from 2 cans coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (plus more to taste)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce (plus more to taste)
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar (plus more to taste)
  • Juice from 1 lime
  • 2 medium zucchini, cut into 1/2 inch thick half moons

Garnish and Sides

  • Minced cilantro
  • Minced basil (preferably Thai basil)
  • Lime wedges
  • Jasmine rice

Instructions

Sauté the aromatics: Heat the vegetable oil over medium-high heat in the pressure cooker pot until shimmering. (Use Sauté mode adjusted to high in an Instant Pot electric pressure cooker.) Stir in the onion, red pepper, garlic, and ginger, sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of salt, and sauté until the onion starts to soften, about 3 minutes.

Fry the curry paste: Scoop the cream from the top of 2 cans of coconut milk and add it to the pot, then stir in the curry paste. (Stop when you hit the thin coconut liquid, and save it for later.) Cook, stirring often, until the curry paste darkens and the fat starts to separate, about 5 minutes.

Pressure cook the curry for 5 minutes, with a quick pressure release: Sprinkle the chicken with the kosher salt. Add the chicken to the pot, and stir to coat with curry paste. Stir in the potatoes, and then the reserved coconut milk liquid, fish sauce, soy sauce, and brown sugar. Lock the lid and pressure cook on high pressure for 5 minutes in an electric PC or 4 minutes in a stovetop PC. Quick release the pressure in the pot.

Finish the curry: Remove the lid from the pressure cooker, then set it over medium-high heat (Sauté mode adjusted to high in an electric pressure cooker.) Stir in the lime juice and the zucchini, and simmer until the zucchini is crisp-tender, about 8 minutes. Taste the curry for seasoning, adding more soy sauce (to add salt) or brown sugar (to add sweet) as needed. Ladle the curry into bowls, sprinkle with minced cilantro and basil, and serve with Jasmine rice.

Notes

Don’t shake the cans of coconut milk – you want the solid layer of cream on the top and the liquid underneath. That lets you fry the coconut cream with the curry paste, then add the liquid later. (If the coconut milk is shaken up, and there isn’t a thick layer of coconut cream on the top, scoop out the top 1/3rd of the can and add it to the pot.)

I use Maesri curry paste, because a single 4 ounce can is the perfect amount for a pressure cooker curry. If you buy your curry paste in a larger tub, use 4 tablespoons.

Want to substitute chicken thighs? (I know I do!) Increase the cooking time to 10 minutes at high pressure in an electric PC, 8 minutes in a stovetop PC.

Tools:

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Pressure Cooker Thai Green Curry with Chicken
Pressure Cooker Massaman Curry
Pressure Cooker Thai Red Curry with Beef
My other Pressure Cooker Recipes
My other Pressure Cooker Time Lapse Videos

Enjoyed this post? Want to help out DadCooksDinner? Subscribe to DadCooksDinner via eMail and share this post with your friends. Want to contribute directly? Donate to my Tip Jar, or buy something from Amazon.com through the links on this site. Thank you.

Thermoworks Smoke Gateway – WiFi bridge

Thermoworks Smoke with Smoke Gateway Wifi Bridge and iphone | DadCooksDinner.com

Thermoworks Smoke with Smoke Gateway Wifi Bridge


Disclaimer: I am a Thermoworks affiliate. Buying a thermometer through my Thermoworks links earns me a few dollars. I love Thermoworks thermometers – I was a fan of theirs long before I became an affiliate. If you buy a thermometer from them, you’re buying the best, and supporting DadCooksDinner at the same time. Thank you!


Last year, I talked about the Thermoworks Smoke – a two probe thermometer with a remote receiver. Before the Smoke, my experience with remote thermometers was not good. They worked as long as I was standing near a window where I could see the grill – but if I went farther into the house…like sitting on the front room sofa – the remote was too far away, and it wouldn’t connect. (The worst ones wouldn’t know they were disconnected – they’d keep reporting the same temperature, even though they’re out of range, and I’d get chicken surprise when I went out on the deck…the bird would be 50°F higher than I thought it was.)

I bought a Thermoworks Smoke and fell in love. It has serious range – the remote is rated for 300 feet away. That may be true; I’ve never tested it to its limits. What I do know is: I can go anywhere in my house, and the remote still connects, showing me the temperature for both my grill and my food. I was thrilled, and use my Smoke whenever I have a multi-hour cook in the backyard.

But what if 300 feet is not enough? What if I want to check the temperature from far, far away? Let’s say, hypothetically, that I forgot to buy red peppers and ginger, and I have to run to the store while a pork shoulder is smoking all afternoon on the grill. Hypothetically, of course. I didn’t forget the red peppers and ginger last Sunday, no I did not. Um. OK. So, 300 feet is fantastic range for a remote thermometer, but what about a few miles away at the grocery store?

 

Thermoworks Smoke Gateway WiFi Bridge Close up | DadCooksDinner.com

Thermoworks Smoke Gateway WiFi Bridge

That’s where the new Smoke Gateway comes in. It is a bridge between the Smoke base unit and the new Smoke app on your iPhone or Android phone, using your home WiFi. It’s broadcasting over the internet – as long as my phone can get an internet connection, I can check my Smoke temperatures. That way I can tell that the grill is doing fine while I’m standing in the checkout line at my grocery store.

Sure, it adds another $89 onto the already expensive $99 smoke…and I really shouldn’t wander off when I’m cooking…but it’s SO COOL. I can barely contain myself. I keep opening the app and checking the temperature (and the handy graphs of the entire cook), even though I’m sitting on my deck, and I can see the base unit from where I’m sitting. Yes, yes, I know. I’m such a geek. But I love my cooking technology!

(Note: the Smoke doesn’t have to be dedicated to outdoor cooking. It is a scaled up version of the ChefAlarm probe thermometer. I pull it out when I’m cooking my Thanksgiving turkey – I can catch the football game in the TV room, remote in my pocket, and not worry about about overcooking the bird.)

Thermoworks Zippered Case - courtesy of Thermoworks | DadCooksDinner.com

Photo courtesy of Thermoworks

And, while I was on the Thermoworks website, I came across the new TX-1010X-SC zippered case…and immediately ordered it. I’ve been jamming the Smoke back into its original box, wires everywhere, and having a case to keep everything organized fits my strain of OCD perfectly.

Links to Thermoworks.com:

Thermoworks Smoke Gateway – WiFi Bridge

Thermoworks Smoke

Thermoworks TX-1010X-SC Zippered Storage Case

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Enjoyed this post? Want to help out DadCooksDinner? Subscribe to DadCooksDinner via eMail and share this post with your friends. Want to contribute directly? Donate to my Tip Jar, or buy something from Amazon.com through the links on this site. Thank you.

Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup (from Scratch)

Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup

I’m on a mission. If you own a pressure cooker, no more store-bought chicken broth! The best chicken soup comes from homemade broth, and the best broth comes from your pressure cooker.

Now, homemade doesn’t mean you should rush out and buy a chicken. Sure, I do that sometimes, but more often my stock is made up from chicken scraps. I don’t throw away trimmings from chicken – they all go into a gallon zip-top bag in the freezer. Butterflied chicken? The back goes in the bag. Cutting up chicken wings? The wingtips go in the bag. A leftover rotisserie chicken carcass? Into the bag. If it’s got bones and some clinging meat, it’s good for stock.

When the bag is full, I’m ready for chicken broth. My wife has a bunch of small potatoes coming out of our backyard garden, so it’s time for pressure cooker chicken potato soup. Now, if you’ve been following my recipes, you should have picked up on my standard chicken soup formula: 8 cups of broth, sautéed aromatics (I like onion, carrot, and celery), a little herbs (thyme), a little wine to deglaze the pan and add acidity, and a starch (my potatoes). After that, it’s up to you. Have some tougher root vegetables you want to throw in the soup? Add them with the potatoes, and pressure cook them. Have some tender vegetables you want to add, like green beans or zucchini? Add them at the very end, and simmer until tender. Potato soup is refrigerator velcro – it’s perfect for using up the odds and ends from your garden…or your refrigerator’s vegetable bin.

Video: Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup (from Scratch) (2:08)

Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup (from Scratch) – Time Lapse YouTube.com

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Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup (from Scratch)


  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 12 cups of soup
  • Category: Sunday Dinner
  • Method: Pressure Cooker
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup from scratch. Start with chicken bones, potatoes, and vegetables. End up with a hearty chicken soup, homemade from your pressure cooker.


Ingredients

Chicken Bone Broth (Makes about 3 quarts of broth)

  • 3 pounds chicken backs (or the carcasses from 2 roasted chickens)
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and halved
  • 1 stalk celery, broken into pieces
  • 1 carrot, scrubbed and broken into pieces
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 8 cups of water (plus more to cover, or to the max fill line of the PC)

Chicken Potato Soup

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1 carrot, peeled and chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine (optional)
  • 1 pound boneless skinless chicken breast, cut into 1-inch cubes (or use chicken thighs)
  • 1 pound New Potatoes, quartered (or red skin potatoes, chopped into rough 1 inch cubes)
  • 8 cups of Chicken Bone Broth (above)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Minced parsley to garnish


Instructions

  1. Pressure cook the broth for 60 minutes: Add the chicken backs, onion, celery, carrot, bay leaf, and salt to the pressure cooker pot, then add the water. (It should cover the chicken backs – if it doesn’t, add water to cover, or up to the max fill line on the pressure cooker). Lock the lid and pressure cook on high pressure for 60 minutes in an electric PC, 50 minutes in a stovetop PC. Let the pressure come down naturally – about 30 minutes. (It takes a long time for all that water to cool off. If you’re in a hurry, let the pressure come down for at least 20 minutes, then quick release any remaining pressure.) Scoop the bones and vegetables out of the pot with a slotted spoon and discard. Strain the broth through a fine mesh strainer and discard the solids. Reserve 8 cups of broth for the soup, and refrigerate or freeze the rest for another use. (I portion it into 2 and 4 cup containers, and freeze for up to 6 months.)
  2. Sauté the aromatics: Wipe out the pressure cooker pot liner, then put it back in the pressure cooker base. Add the vegetable oil and heat over sauté mode (medium heat for a stovetop PC) until shimmering, about 3 minutes. Add the onion, celery, and carrot, and sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and the thyme. Sauté, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften and turn translucent, about 5 minutes. Pour in the wine, bring to a boil, and boil for 1 minute to boil off some of the alcohol. Stir in the cubed chicken breast, then the potatoes.
  3. Pressure cook the soup for 4 minutes: Add the 8 cups of chicken broth to the pot, lock the lid on the pot, and pressure cook for 4 minutes on high pressure (same timing for both electric and stovetop PCs). Let the pressure come down naturally for 10 minutes, then quick release the rest of the pressure. (If the steam that is released starts to sputter and spit out starch, shut the valve and let the pressure come down for another 5 minutes before quick releasing again.)
  4. Season to taste: Add salt and pepper to taste, and don’t be shy with the salt – taste as you add the salt, and stop when the broth goes from bland to full bodied and a little sweet. (Homemade stock is bland without salt; I add about 2 teaspoons of fine sea salt to get the taste right.)

Notes

  • You can make the entire batch of broth ahead of time if you need a quick weeknight recipe. Finish step 1, then freeze all the broth in 2 cup containers. When you’re ready for soup, grab 8 cups of broth from the freezer, and continue with step 2.
  • And sigh…if you insist on store-bought broth, replace step 1 with 8 cups of broth. Just don’t tell me about it. It makes me sad.
  • If you have leftovers from 2 roasted chickens, use the bones to make the broth, and about 2 cups of shredded chicken instead of the raw chicken breast.
  • Don’t want to use alcohol? Skip the wine, and add a splash of vinegar (wine vinegar or cider vinegar) in the “Season to taste” step.

Tools:

  • 6 quart or larger pressure cooker. I love my 6 quart Instant Pot electric pressure cooker, but I usually pull out my 8 quart Instant Pot when I use a bag of frozen bones. it’s easier to fit the block of frozen chicken pieces below the max fill line in the larger pot.
  • Slotted Spoon and Fine Mesh Strainer for straining the broth. (A second inner pot for your pressure cooker is the perfect place to strain the broth into.)

Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup (From Scratch) Step-by-step tower | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Chicken Potato Soup (From Scratch)

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Pressure Cooker Chicken Soup with Rice (From Scratch)

Pressure Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup with Vegetables

Pressure Cooker Tortilla Soup (Sopa de Tortilla)

My other Pressure Cooker Recipes

My other Pressure Cooker Time Lapse Videos

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Working on a recipe video | DadCooksDinner.com

Nine Years of DadCooksDinner

Working on a recipe video | DadCooksDinner.com

My favorite PicOfTheWeek: Working on a recipe video

The other day, my friend Judy said that Fall is the real start of the new year. “That’s it!”. She’s absolutely right – I think it’s the rhythm of the school year – but I always treat Fall as when I start new projects. (New Years Resolutions are for when those projects aren’t going so well…but that’s another story.) So, it’s appropriate that my blog anniversary is in late August.

Specifically, August 20th, 2008. DadCooksDinner started when I posted a recipe (and I use the term “recipe” loosely) for Chipotle en Adobo Puree. It’s 2017 now – holy cow – and I’ve been writing here for 9 years. I’ve know I’ve been doing this for a while, but 9 years? That’s a lot of recipes.

2016–2017 recap

As you probably noticed, I leaned into pressure cooking even more over the last year. This has been good for the blog, from a traffic standpoint; the Instant Pot is a cultural phenomenon, and pressure cooker baby back ribs, chicken legs, quick chili, and New York cheesecake are some of my most popular recipes.

I have also focused on video, making a short time lapse of almost every recipe this year. I enjoy these, and they are expanding my video skills, but they have not been that popular on YouTube. (They’re doing a little better of Facebook, but Facebook doesn’t bring me a whole lot of love. Facebook wants you to stay on Facebook, not leave to some blog for the recipe.) I’m going to keep making the videos – they’re pretty easy to put together with my current workflow – but I’m considering changes in the new year.

I also took a month off from the day job. (One of the best perks of my day job is a sabbatical every 5 years.) We hit the road to the East Coast, and had a great time in Montreal, Maine, New York City…and then “back home” to our cottage in Madison, OH. I still feel like I’m trying to get caught up after the trip, though…gone for a month punched a huge hole in my schedule.

So, what’s coming in the next year? That blog theme redesign I teased last week is Coming Soon. Very soon. (Hopefully next week. Fingers crossed.) I’m plugging away at my pressure cooking cookbook; I’m finally keeping the procrastination monster at bay, and making progress on the writing. And…other than that, I don’t know what the new year will bring. That’s part of the beauty of blogging: I never know what’s coming next.

Finally, a shout out to my loyal readers. I love writing this blog, but I doubt I could have kept it up for 9 years if you were not reading what I have to say. Thank you!

Top 5 recipes in 2017

Pressure Cooker Macaroni and Cheese

Pressure Cooker Macaroni and Cheese

Pressure Cooker Macaroni and Cheese – Dad Cooks Dinner

Pressure Cooker Corned Beef and Cabbage | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Corned Beef and Cabbage

Pressure Cooker Corned Beef and Cabbage – Dad Cooks Dinner

Basic Technique: Grilling Sausages

Basic Technique: Grilled Sausages – Dad Cooks Dinner

Pressure Cooker Baby Back Ribs | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Baby Back Ribs

Pressure Cooker Baby Back Ribs – Dad Cooks Dinner (Did I mention this is my new breakout hit? You’ll see it again soon…)

Grilled Tomahawk Steak (Long Bone Ribeye, Reverse Seared)

Grilled Tomahawk Steak (Long Bone Ribeye, Reverse Seared)

Grilled Tomahawk Steak (Long Bone Ribeye, Reverse Seared) – Dad Cooks Dinner

Honorable mention:

Top 5 new recipes (recipes published in 2017):

Pressure Cooker Baby Back Ribs | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Baby Back Ribs

Pressure Cooker Baby Back Ribs – Dad Cooks Dinner

Pressure Cooker Quick Chili with Canned Beans | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Quick Chili with Canned Beans

Pressure Cooker Quick Chili with Canned Beans – Dad Cooks Dinner

Pressure Cooker Chicken Legs with Herb Rub | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Chicken Legs with Herb Rub

Pressure Cooker Chicken Legs with Herb Rub

 

Pressure Cooker New York Cheesecake | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker New York Cheesecake

Pressure Cooker New York Cheesecake

Pressure Cooker Teriyaki Chicken Drumsticks | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Teriyaki Chicken Drumsticks

Pressure Cooker Teriyaki Chicken Drumsticks – Dad Cooks Dinner

Honorable mention:

Top 5 7 Instagram Pics from 2017 (most of them on the road)

(Sorry, I couldn’t help myself – had to add a couple of time lapses at the end there…)

Guacamole En Molcajete at @rosamexicano #nyceats

A post shared by Mike Vrobel – Food Blogger (@dadcooksdinner) on

Hasslebeck potatoes- cooking class at the @saltlakeculinarycenter for #efc2017

A post shared by Mike Vrobel – Food Blogger (@dadcooksdinner) on

Orval day at @winkinglizardtavern #orvaltrappistale

A post shared by Mike Vrobel – Food Blogger (@dadcooksdinner) on

Fruit-infused coconut water snack from @mysmithsgrocery #EFC2017 #smithsfoodie

A post shared by Mike Vrobel – Food Blogger (@dadcooksdinner) on

Dinner tonight: steak of the week is Porterhouse! Thanks to #bestbeef @certifiedangusbeef and @acme_fresh_market #spon

A post shared by Mike Vrobel – Food Blogger (@dadcooksdinner) on

Time lapse from the 86th floor of the @EmpireStateBuilding – that's Times Square lit up in the center left. #EmpireStateBuilding

A post shared by Mike Vrobel – Food Blogger (@dadcooksdinner) on

Visiting the sponsor booths at #EFC2017 – lots of great brands to meet with and samples to try. #somanysamplessolittletime

A post shared by Mike Vrobel – Food Blogger (@dadcooksdinner) on

Top 5 Pressure Cooker Time Lapse videos on YouTube


Pressure Cooker New York Cheesecake [YouTube.com]


Pressure Cooker Baby Back Ribs [YouTube.com]


Pressure Cooker Corned Beef and Cabbage


Pressure Cooker Buffalo Chicken Wings


Pressure Cooker Greek Lamb Shanks – Time Lapse – YouTube

What do you think?

Questions? Anything you’re looking forward to in the next year? Leave them in the comments section below.

Enjoyed this post? Want to help out DadCooksDinner? Subscribe to DadCooksDinner via eMail or RSS reader, recommend DadCooksDinner to your friends, and buy something from Amazon.com through the links on this site. Thank you.

Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas with Red Chile Sauce

Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas


Thank you to my friends at Certified Angus Beef® Brand for sponsoring DadCooksDinner.Please check them out at hashtag #BestBeef for more beef recipes, and visit them at the Certified Angus Beef Kitchen Community on Facebook. Thank you!


It started with my brother Pat’s brisket. He did a real barbecued packer brisket, 12+ pounds, low and slow for 18 hours. He knew we wouldn’t finish it in one sitting…we’re carnivores, but that’s a lot of beef, even for us. His plan for the leftovers was almost as good as the original brisket – beef brisket enchiladas.

I came home from vacation, opened up the freezer, and saw the brisket I bought back in May. Sigh. I had plans for it, a lazy weekend, multi-day, low and slow barbecue. And then life intervened. Suddenly, it’s August, the kids are back in school, and I need to free up space in the freezer. Time to get to work.

Whole @certifiedangusbeef briskets on sale this weekend at my local @acme_fresh_market ! #somuchbeef #BestBeef #sponsored

A post shared by Mike Vrobel – Food Blogger (@dadcooksdinner) on

I trim the brisket, save the point for another meal, and cut the flat into cubes so it will cook quicker. Instead of store-bought Enchilada sauce, I toss dried peppers, an onion, and some garlic in the pot. They’re the base of my homemade enchilada sauce. They soften up in the long cooking time, and then I blend them up with tomatoes and some defatted pot liquid.
(If dried peppers are a step too far, you can use store-bought enchilada sauce – see the recipe notes. In fact, if you have a couple of pounds of leftover beef from my pressure cooker barbecued brisket, you can use canned enchilada sauce and skip to step 5 – shred the beef.)

Most pressure cooker recipes are quick…but not this one. Enchiladas are a multi-step process. Cooking the brisket, shredding the beef, rolling the enchiladas, and baking – it takes a couple of hours, end to end. Now, a lot of that is free time, because there’s not much to do while the pressure cooker is cooking, or while the enchiladas are baking. The pressure cooker does what it does best – compress time, and cook the brisket in about an hour. (Not that there’s anything wrong with low and slow barbecued brisket – but sometimes you don’t have a whole weekend to dedicate to a cooking project.) My only request: don’t try this recipe on a busy weeknight – make tacos instead.

Video: Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas – Time Lapse (3:05)


Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas [YouTube.com]

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Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas with Red Chile Sauce


  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 50 minutes
  • Yield: 14 Enchiladas
  • Category: Sunday Dinner
  • Method: Pressure Cooker
  • Cuisine: Mexican

Description

Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas with Red Chile sauce. Shredded beef brisket smothered with homemade enchilada sauce from my pressure cooker.


Ingredients

  • 2 pounds beef brisket, cut into 1 1/2-inch squares
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons fine sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 large onion, peeled and halved
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and left whole
  • 6 dried guajillo or dried New Mexico chile peppers, seeded and stemmed
  • 1 cup water
  • 28-ounce can fire roasted diced tomatoes with liquid
  • 1 Tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 8 ounces shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • 14 corn tortillas
  • Minced green onions for garnish

Instructions

  1. Stem and seed the peppers: Use kitchen scissors to cut the stems off of the dried peppers, then cut along one side of the pepper to open it up, and shake out the seeds. Rinse the peppers.
  2. Fill the pressure cooker: Sprinkle the brisket pieces with 2 teaspoons salt and pepper, then loosely pile them in the pressure cooker. Top with the onions, garlic, and dried chile peppers, then pour in the water.
  3. Pressure cook the brisket for 40 minutes, with a short natural pressure release: Lock the lid on the pressure cooker. Cook on high pressure for 40 minutes in an electric pressure cooker, or 35 minutes in a stovetop PC. Let the pressure to come down naturally for 10 minutes, then quick release any pressure left in the pot. (Note: I use the short natural pressure release because I’m in a hurry to move on to the enchiladas; if you have the time, go with a full natural pressure release.)
  4. Make the sauce: Remove the beef from the pressure cooker with tongs and a slotted spoon, and set aside. Strain everything left in the pot – the peppers, onions, garlic, and liquid – through a strainer, then put the pot liquid in a fat separator. Put the solids from the strainer into a blender, pour the fire roasted diced tomatoes into the blender, and add 1 cup of defatted pot liquid. Holding the lid of the blender down with a kitchen towel, start the blender on low and slowly turn it up to highest speed. Blend for 2 minutes, or until the sauce is completely smooth, then stir in the apple cider vinegar and set aside.
  5. Shred the beef: Shred the beef with a pair of forks, then stir in 1/2 cup of the blender sauce to moisten.
  6. Warm the tortillas: Put the stack of tortillas in a zip-top bag, fold the bag over, then microwave on high for 1 minute, and let stand for 1 minute. (Or use a tortilla warmer.)
  7. Build and bake the enchiladas: Set the oven to 350°F. Roll 1/4 cup shredded beef into each tortilla, then set them side by side in a 9-inch by 13 -inch baking dish – 10 down the length of the dish, then squeeze 4 in on the side. Pour the rest of the sauce from the blender over the enchiladas, making sure to completely cover the tortillas in sauce. (Dry tortilla edges come out tough). Sprinkle the Monterey Jack cheese over the top of the sauce. Put the pan in the oven and bake until the sauce is bubbling and the cheese has melted, about 20 minutes. Pull the pan out of the oven, sprinkle with minced green onions to garnish, and serve.

Notes

  • I had about a cup of shredded meat left over, and a few extra tortillas that wouldn’t fit into the baking dish, so I had a few shredded beef tacos on the side as a Chef’s treat.
  • If you want to substitute flour tortillas, get 6-inch tortillas (“fajita size”), and fill them with a 1/2 cup of each. You’ll only get 10 to 12 in your pan, depending on how tight you roll and how much you squeeze them.
  • This recipe doubles easily – if you want to make two pans of enchiladas, start with 4 pounds of brisket, etc…
  • Want to use store-bought enchilada sauce? Substitute a 28-ounce can of enchilada sauce, and skip the dried peppers, onion, garlic, and diced tomatoes.

Tools

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas - Step by Step Tower | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Beef Brisket Enchiladas – Step by Step Tower

Related Posts

Pressure Cooker Boneless Beef Short Rib Tacos with Dried Chile Pepper Sauce
Pressure Cooker Shredded Chicken in Black Mole Sauce
Pressure Cooker Braised Lamb Shoulder Tacos (Cordero Guisado) – Dad Cooks Dinner
My other Pressure Cooker Recipes
My other Pressure Cooker Time Lapse Videos

Enjoyed this post? Want to help out DadCooksDinner? Subscribe to DadCooksDinner via eMail or RSS reader, recommend DadCooksDinner to your friends, and buy something from Amazon.com through the links on this site. Thank you.

Theme Moving Day

If everything goes according to plan, as you read this we’ll be moving my blog to its new theme and color scheme. If not, I’ll be shaking my fist at the computer gods, and we’ll be trying again in a week or so. Wish me luck!

[Update 2017-08-27: And…not this week. Darn. We’ve rescheduled for the week after Labor day. So, stop back in two weeks to see what’s up…)

Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage

Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage

One of our stops in New York City was Mario Batali’s Eataly. It is a wonderful stop for a food fanatic like me – it houses multiple restaurants, a wine bar, and an Italian specialty market, with a butcher, fishmonger, and cheesemonger. I can entertain myself for hours, wandering around the market section, drooling over the steaks and seafood on display, fingering the kitchen tools, and…grabbing a bag of Umbrian lentils. (And a Mario Batail signature orange peppermill. I had to.)

Umbria is famous for its lentils; other than French Lentils du Puy, they are the only lentils I know sold by region, not color. (That is, all the lentils I can buy in Northeastern Ohio are either just “lentils” – brown lentils – or sometimes green and red lentils are available.)

I usually substitute brown lentils when I want to do an Italian style lentil dish, but now I am stocked up. It’s time for Umbian Lentil and Sausage stew – Salsicce e Lenticchie all’Umbriana – the traditional meal from the region.

Video: Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage – Time Lapse (1:50)


Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage [YouTube.com]

Recipe: Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage

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Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage


  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: 6-8 servings
  • Category: Weeknight Dinner
  • Method: Pressure Cooker
  • Cuisine: Italian

Description

Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage recipe. Salsicce e Lenticchie, Umbrian sausage and lentil stew, in my Instant Pot pressure cooker.


Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 pound sweet or hot Italian sausage, cut into 1/2 inch rings
  • 500g (1 pound) Umbrian lentils (or brown lentils)
  • 1 large onion, peeled and diced
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and diced
  • 1 celery stalk, diced
  • 4 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning (or dried basil)
  • 15-ounce can petite diced tomatoes with juices
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • Salt and pepper to taste


Instructions

  1. Rinse the lentils: Put the lentils in a strainer and rinse thoroughly with cold water. Let stand to drain while you prepare the rest of the recipe.
  2. Brown the sausage: Heat the olive oil in the pressure cooker over medium-high heat until the oil starts shimmering. (Use browning mode or sauté mode adjusted to high in an electric pressure cooker). Add the sausage and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned and crispy around on the edges, about 5 minutes. Move the sausage to a bowl with a slotted spoon, leaving as much fat behind as possible.
  3. Sauté the aromatics: Add the onion, carrot, celery, and garlic to the pressure cooker. Sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning. Sauté until the onion is softened, about 5 minutes, scraping any browned bits of sausage from the bottom of the pot into the onions.
  4. Pressure cook the lentils for 10 minutes with a natural pressure release: Add the lentils to the pot and stir into the aromatics, scraping the bottom of the pot again to loosen any browned onions. Stir in the browned sausage and any juices in the bowl. Stir in the can of tomatoes. Pour in the 6 cups of water and add 1 teaspoon of salt. Lock the lid and pressure cook on high pressure for 10 minutes in an electric PC or 8 minutes in a stovetop PC. Let the pressure come down naturally, about 20 minutes.
  5. Season and serve: Remove the lid from the pressure cooker. Taste the lentils for doneness and seasoning. If the lentils aren’t soft enough, simmer for another five minutes or so (don’t bring back to pressure – use simmer mode on the cooker or simmer on the stovetop). Add salt and pepper as necessary – when I use water or homemade chicken stock, I usually add another half teaspoon of sea salt. Serve.

Notes

  • For a vegetarian version of this recipe, skip the sausage, and cook the onions a longer, to get a little browning around the edges.

Tools

Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage - Step by Step Tower Image | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Umbrian Lentils and Sausage – Step by Step

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Pressure Cooker Pasta and Bean Soup (Pasta e Fagioli, AKA Pasta Fazool)
Pressure Cooker French Lentils
Pressure Cooker Quick Tomato Sauce
My other Pressure Cooker Recipes
My other Pressure Cooker Time Lapse Videos

Enjoyed this post? Want to help out DadCooksDinner? Subscribe to DadCooksDinner via eMail or RSS reader, recommend DadCooksDinner to your friends, and buy something from Amazon.com through the links on this site. Thank you.

Electric Pressure Cooker Tote Bags | DadCooksDinner.com

Electric Pressure Cooker Tote Bags

Electric Pressure Cooker Tote Bags | DadCooksDinner.com

Electric Pressure Cooker Tote Bags

Question from a reader: Have you tried a pressure cooker carrying bag?

Years ago, I bought a slow cooker that came with a travel bag. I used it a lot, especially for potlucks and my annual chili cookoff at work. Now that I have an Instant Pot, my pressure cooker is gathering dust in the cabinet…but I miss having that travel bag.

So, when I got this question, I went over to Amazon to see what was available. I found two pressure cooker tote bags: the $30 Pressure Chef, and the $40 Quick & Carry; I ordered them both to see what I thought of them. (The things I do for my readers…like order more stuff from Amazon.

Quick & Carry Travel Tote Bag

The Quick & Carry is the fancier of the two bags. It has a main central pouch for the pressure cooker, with a zipper around the lid of the bag to lift the cooker in and out. It also has two zippered accessory pockets – one on the top of the lid and one on the front – to carry extra equipment. It has a shoulder strap on the sides, and a padded handle strap on the lid. The Quick & Carry is made of heavy, woven nylon, with padding in the sides and bottom. It is available in both 6 and 8 quart sizes. I bought the 6 quart, and it was a tight fit for my 6 quart Instant Pot Plus and Fagor Lux cookers.

Pressure Chef Storage & Tote Bag

The Pressure Chef is a more minimalist bag – nothing but a zippered central pouch and a handle. The other difference is the material – it is a smooth, insulated nylon bag. It is also a tight fit for my 6 quart Instant Pot Plus and Fagor Lux cookers. It is only available in a 6 quart size.

Electric Pressure Cooker Tote Bags - Open with cookers inside | DadCooksDinner.com

Bags open – note the top zipper on the Quick and Carry vs the middle zipper on the Pressure Chef

Which do I prefer?

Of the two, I prefer the design of the Pressure Chef. It feels more solidly built: the handle is sturdier, and the extra insulation protects me when I’m moving a pot full of hot chili. The zipper around the middle of the bag makes it easier to get the pressure cooker in and out, and the smooth sides will be easier to clean. It collapses down when not in use, so it’s easy to store under my kitchen island. The Pressure Chef is the bag I’m reaching for when I need to take my Instant Pot on the road.

However…that doesn’t mean the Quick & Carry is a bad bag. The extra zippered pouches come in handy if you want to keep all your pressure cooker accessories in one bag – you can fit a non-pressure lid and some pinch mitts in the top pouch. (When I’m traveling, I bring lots more equipment than just my Instant Pot accessories, so I already need a second bag.)

Also, if you want a tote bag for a larger 8 quart cooker, the 8 quart Quick & Carry is your only option – the Pressure Chef doesn’t come in a larger size.

Taking your cooker on the road? Get a tote!


What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

My list of suggested Pressure Cooker Tools
Which Pressure Cooker Should I Buy
My Pressure Cooker Recipes

 

Enjoyed this post? Want to help out DadCooksDinner? Subscribe to DadCooksDinner via eMail or RSS reader, recommend DadCooksDinner to your friends, and buy something from Amazon.com through the links on this site. Thank you.

Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard

Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard

After my country or western ribs rant last week, the least I could do is write you a country ribs recipe.

I went with one of my favorite flavor profiles – pork and cider. In France, they would make the recipe with hard cider (preferably from Normandy) and Dijon mustard; here in America, cider is really taking off in popularity, but if you can’t find it, go ahead and use regular apple cider. I stick with the Dijon mustard – Grey Poupon, but of course – but go ahead and use any grainy mustard you happen to have on hand. (Ballpark yellow mustard doesn’t work…unless you’re from Northeastern Ohio and can get Cleveland Stadium’s Ball Park Mustard. But I may be biased.)

And, from my recipe testing, the only real difference between pork country-style ribs and western ribs is that the country-style ribs are cut from right next to the loin, and have a some loin meat on them. The loin meat dries out if you cook it too long. My shoulder rib testing gave me good results between 45 minutes and an hour, depending on how shreddable I wanted the meat. For country ribs, 45 minutes is the max; after that, they start to dry out.

Video: Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard (1:56)


Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard [YouTube.com]

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Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard


  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6-8 servings
  • Category: Sunday Dinner
  • Method: Pressure Cooker
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard recipe. Country-style ribs with apples and mustard – a hearty meal from the pressure cooker.


Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 3 pounds pork country-style ribs (or pork shoulder western ribs)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons fine sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 large onion, minced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 cup hard cider (or apple cider)
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

Instructions

  1. Brown the ribs: Season the pork country ribs with the 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt and 1/2 teaspoon of pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. (In an electric pressure cooker, use saute mode adjusted to high or browning mode.) Brown the ribs in 2 batches: Put half the ribs in the pot and brown them on one side, about 4 minutes. Remove the browned ribs to a bowl and add the rest of the ribs, browning them on one side, about 4 more minutes. Add the second batch of ribs to the bowl.
  2. Saute the aromatics: Add the onion and garlic to the pot, and sprinkle with the thyme and 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Saute until the onions soften, about 5 minutes, scraping the bottom of the pot to loosen up any browned bits of pork. Add the cider to the pot, bring to a simmer, then stir in the Dijon mustard. Stack the ribs loosely in the pot – I had to do this in 2 levels – and pour any pork juices into the pot.
  3. Pressure cook the country ribs for 45 minutes with a natural pressure release: Lock the lid on the pressure cooker and cook at high pressure for 45 minutes in an electric PC or 40 minutes in a stovetop PC. Let the pressure release naturally, about 15 minutes.
  4. Serve: Remove the ribs to a platter. Pour the liquid from the pot into a fat separator and rest for ten minutes. Pour a few tablespoons of defatted sauce over the ribs, then pass the rest of the sauce at the table.

Notes

If you’re in a hurry, you can skip the browning and defatting steps – but they both help the recipe, and the browning step in particular adds a lot of flavor to the sauce.

Tools

Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard - Image Tower | DadCooksDinner.com

Pressure Cooker Pork Country Ribs with Cider and Mustard

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Pressure Cooker Pork Western Shoulder Ribs with Barbecue Rub and Sauce
Pressure Cooker Baby Back Ribs
Pressure Cooker Pork and Sauerkraut
Country Ribs vs Western Ribs – Dad Cooks Dinner
My other Pressure Cooker Recipes
My other Pressure Cooker Time Lapse Videos

 

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Pressure Cooker Red Pepper Hummus | DadCooksDinner.com

The Case of the Missing Inner Pot

Pressure Cooker Red Pepper Hummus | DadCooksDinner.com

Don’t forget the inner pot!

The cook at our house cooked rice in the instant pot, but since the stainless container was soaking in the sink from the previous use, the cook didn’t remember there was a container to put it in first! So it went directly into the bottom of the InstantPot.

I’ve managed to get most of the burned and uncooked rice out of the InstantPot, but there are a few rice kernels inside. I removed the bottom of the InstantPot and was able to get more of them out this way also. Oil was used along with the water in the cooking process.

Commenter Treva

Oh, Treva, I know exactly how this feels.

Years ago, I was teaching Tim how to pressure cook his favorite side dish – black beans. This was a while ago – I think we were still using my Instant Pot Lux, or maybe my Cuisinart Electric Pressure cooker. Anyway, I showed Tim how to sort beans, and had him set up on the counter next to the kitchen sink. The pressure cooker itself was plugged in on our kitchen island. When Tim finished sorting, I had a great idea – I’ll bring the inner pot to him, and set it in the sink next to him. That way, he can pour the beans into the pot, any beans that miss will wind up in the sink, and we can fill it up with water right there. This all worked great – Tim was ready to go, with the pot full of dried beans and water in his hands.

I told him “Put it in the pressure cooker”, then checked how the other kids were doing (we were all working on Taco Night.) I saw Tim cross the kitchen with the inner pot, lift it…and pour the contents into the pressure cooker base.

I felt like I was moving in slow motion – “Noooo! Stop!” – and most of the beans and water were poured into the pressure cooker base before he realized that something was wrong. Water was streaming out of the pressure cooker base – I found out there are a lot of holes in there. I quickly unplugged the base, then we started mopping up the counter with towels.

Not having any better ideas (like contacting InstantPot.com/support to find out what I should have done), I dumped the beans out and dried the pressure cooker base with paper towels, reaching under the heating element with the edges of towels to try to absorb as much of the liquid as possible. I left the cooker base sitting upside down in our dish drain for a handful of days, until it looked completely dry, then crossed my fingers and plugged it in. And…everything worked! The control panel lit up, all the buttons responded when I pushed them, and a “2 cups of water” pressure test was a success.

That pressure cooker was still chugging along when I upgraded to the Instant Pot Duo a few years later. If it’s the Lux, I passed it on to my sister-in-law, where it is still working.

They must build electric pressure cookers knowing mistakes will be made – liquid will wind up in the base of the cooker – and drain properly. That said, after writing this post, I sent an email off to Instant Pot, asking what I should have done. I’ll update my Instant Pot FAQ with their answer.

Any Instant Pot mistakes you’d like to share?

How about you? Any kitchen disaster stories you’d like to share? (They seem much funnier in hindsight.) Tell us about them in the comments section below.

 

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La Caja China Pig Roast | DadCooksDinner.com

Matt’s La Caja China Pig Roast

La Caja China Pig Roast | DadCooksDinner.com

La Caja China Pig Roast

My brother Matt is our king of the pig roast.

Years ago, he bought a La Caja China roasting box. Ever since, about once a year, he treats us with a pig roast. There’s nothing quite like inviting 30 friends over, dropping a whole pig on the kitchen island, and telling them: “dig in!”.

The roasting box is a metal lined wooden box. You dump a lot of charcoal on the lid – a LOT of charcoal – and the heat radiates through the metal lid, turning the box into a high heat roasting oven. The roasting box cooks a whole pig in about 3.5 hours, depending on the size of the pig. (50 to 100 pounds – a small pig – is about right for the large #2 size La Caja China). I’ve made some fantastic pork in my day, and this pig matches any of them.

La Caja China Pig Roast - prep steps collage | DadCooksDinner.com

Clockwise from top left: Pig in the roasting rack; pig in the box; starting the coals; adding more coals after an hour

For the last day of our cottage vacation, Matt ordered a 75 pound pig from the West Side Market and invited our extended family for a pig roast. I’ve been meaning to blog about Matt’s pig roasts for a while, so this was my big opportunity. I was there for the whole process and had time to help out and had time to take pictures while my brother Pat helped out with the cooking. (Sorry, guys!)

La Caja China Pig Roast - cooking steps collage | DadCooksDinner.com

Clockwise from top left: Adding more coals; shaking out the ashes; peeking at the pig skin; ready to serve!

Having a second person to help is important. A whole pig is too large for one person to handle, especially when it is spread out in the roasting box’s cooking grid. Now, don’t worry – a roasting box is surprisingly hands off. Most of the job is sitting around the roasting box and drinking beer while the pig roasts inside. Add some charcoal every hour; shake out the coals and flip the pig for the last 30 minutes to crisp up the skin. That’s it; after 3 1/2 hours, you have a gorgeous roast pig to shock and awe your dining crowd.

Recipe: Matt’s La Caja China Pig Roast

Inspired by: Roast Pig instructions, La Caja China [lacajachina.com]

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La Caja China Pig Roast | DadCooksDinner.com

Matt’s La Caja China Pig Roast


  • Author:
  • Prep Time: 2 days
  • Cook Time: 3 hours 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 3 hours 30 minutes
  • Yield: 38 servings
  • Category: Sunday Dinner
  • Method: Roasting Box
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Matt’s La Caja China Pig Roast – cooking a 75 pound pig in a La Caja China roasting box.


Ingredients

  • 75 pound dressed pig (That is, cleaned and gutted. Will serve about 38 people.)
  • Small Apple (to shove in the mouth – the teeth are sharp. Note that we forgot this in the pictures…)
  • 3/4 cup kosher salt (about 1/2 teaspoon per pound)

Rub (My homemade rub, or use 0.75 cup store bought rub)

  • 4 tablespoons paprika
  • 4 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme


Instructions

  1. Dry brine the pig: 24 hours to 2 days before cooking, sprinkle the pig with the salt, concentrating most of it on the meat side – that is, a little on the skin side, more on the meat side. Store the pig in a large cooler, covered with bags of ice. (Don’t open the bags – Replace bags as they melt. We swapped in a couple of big bags of grocery store ice every 24 hours.)
  2. Season the pig and spread it out in the roasting rack: The day of cooking, remove the pig from the cooler, pat it dry with paper towels as best you can, then spread the pig out on top of one of the roasting racks, skin side down. Sprinkle the meat side of the pig with the rub. Make sure the pig is spread open – we want it spread out as much as possible to cook evenly – and set the other roasting rack on top of the pig. Connect the racks with the s-hooks, sandwiching the pig between the racks. Set the drip pan in the roasting box, and then put the pig in the box, on top of the drip pan, skin side down.
  3. Cook the pig for 3 hours: Close the box with the ash pan and charcoal grid tray. Pour an entire 16-pound bag of charcoal into 2 big piles on top of the charcoal tray. Light the charcoal – this is one time when it’s OK to use lighter fluid, because the pig is protected from the flavor of the fluid in the box. When the charcoal is covered with ash, spread it out into an even layer over the entire charcoal tray, and start the cooking timer. After 1 hour of cooking spread 8 pounds of unlit charcoal over the top of the box. After 2 hours of cooking, spread another 8 pounds of unlit charcoal over the top. After another 30 minutes (2.5 hours of cooking), spread another 8 pounds of unlit charcoal over the top, and cook for 30 minutes more.
  4. Crisp the skin for 30 minutes: After 3 hours of cooking, have two people wearing hand protection lift the charcoal grid tray and shake out the coals into the ash pan. Carefully set the charcoal grid on the handles of the roasting box. Lift the ash tray off of the box and dump the ashes into a fire-safe container. Lift the charcoal grid off of the handles, slide the ash tray underneath, and set them both back down on the handles for now. Flip the pig in the box so the pig is skin side up. Set the ash tray and coals back on top of the box, closing it once more. Cook the pig for 30 minutes to crisp the skin. At that point, check the pig – lift the edge of the lid of coals and peek at the skin. If the skin is browned and crispy (and maybe blackening a little at the edges), it is done. Otherwise, keep cooking, peeking every 10 minutes or so, until the skin is browned and crispy.
  5. Serve: Again, wearing hand protection, have 2 people remove the ash pan and coals to the handles of the box. Grab the pig and carry it to a table (we cover a table in aluminum foil and then a layer of kitchen towels). Remove the top grid and set it aside, then let the pig rest for 15 to 30 minutes. To serve, you can let your guests tear into the pig themselves (our usual approach), or start “picking the pig” and shredding the meat yourself. (Don’t forget pieces of the crackling skin – they’re the best part.)

Notes

  • Why “La Caja China” for a Cuban roasting box built in Miami? I…I don’t know. The best guess is  “Chinese Box” sounded exotic in Cuba back in the day.
  • How big of a pig? Assume .5 pounds of dressed, uncooked pig per person. That means my brother’s 75 pound pig would serve about 38 people. This is “dressed weight”, meaning a cleaned and gutted pig. A “live weight” pig weighs about 25% more, so make sure you’re asking for dressed weight. (Or increase by 25% for a live weight pig, before they dress it – about .375 pounds of live weight pig per person.) My brother’s roasting box will fit up to a 100 pound pig.
  • Don’t have time to dry brine? Skip that step, and sprinkle the pig with the salt and rub right before cooking. It will still taste pretty darned good.
  • Injection brine: Instead of dry brining, my brother will sometimes use an injection brine. (If you go this route, skip the dry brine salt from the recipe and make a double batch of rub – some for the injection brine, some for the pig.) The night before cooking, whisk this marinade until the salt dissolves, then inject it into the meat of the pig – aim for every 3 to 4 inches in the shoulder and legs, and inject in a couple of places between every rib:
    • 2 cups apple juice
    • 2 cups water
    • 3/4 cup rub (make extra)
    • 1 cup kosher salt
    • 0.5 cup Molasses
    • 0.5 cup apple cider vinegar

    Keep the pig overnight in the cooler, covered with ice, so the brine has time to absorb into the meat. Follow the cooking instructions as listed above, starting with the rub.

Tools

La Caja China Pig Roast - finishing up collage | DadCooksDinner.com

Clockwise from top left: Pig in rack, spread out and ready for the grill; improvised windbreak; 3 generations of Vrobels check on the pig; the star of the show, ready for his closeup

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Rotisserie Pork Shoulder with South Carolina Mustard Sauce
Slow Roasted Pork Shoulder with Beer and Mustard Sauce
Rotisserie Leg of Pork Roast with Injection Brine and Herb Rub

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