All posts tagged: soup

Pressure Cooker Lentil and Hambone Soup

I’m the guest who haunts the kitchen after holiday dinner, saying “Wait! Don’t throw those bones away. I’ll take them with me.” (Yes, I’m a big hit at parties.)I only do this to family members. Now, when they see me come into the kitchen, they shake their heads and dig under the counter for the gallon ziploc bags. They’re family, so they have to invite me back, right? Now, what do I do with those bones? In this case, I got a great hambone from my brother-in-law; I threw it in the freezer, saved it for a couple of weeks, then used it to make lentil and ham soup. If there’s extra meat on the bone, I’m good to go; if not, I ask for a care package of leftover ham to dice and stir into the soup. (Which is a good idea in general, even with a meaty bone. But I’m usually pushing my luck asking for bones; I don’t want to get greedy.) After that, soup is easy with my pressure cooker. Saute …

Pressure Cooker Mexican Chicken Soup in Red Chile Broth (Caldo de Pollo Rojo)

One of the eye opening meals I had in Mexico was Caldo Rojo – a bowl of red, spicy soup, served with a platter of shredded vegetables, lime wedges, and hot sauce on the side. The broth was fantastic – more spicy than hot, with a complex mix of flavors. Without thinking, I dumped a big handful of the shredded cabbage, cilantro, peppers, and radishes into my soup. One of my tour mates was worried. Would the raw vegetables get me? Luckily, I avoided Montezuma’s revenge, and I’m glad I added the vegetables – they add a wonderful crunch to the soup. I came home determined to make that red broth myself. This soup will take more determined shopping than usual; dried ancho chile peppers are available at most grocery stores, but you may have to go to your local Mexican market to find the guajillo and chipotle chiles. (If you can’t find them, substitute more ancho peppers for the guajillo, and one canned chipotle en adobo for the dried chipotle.) And don’t forget the …

Pressure Cooker Tortilla Soup (Sopa de Tortilla)

What surprised me the most during my trip to Mexico? Soup. In Oaxaca, soup was everywhere. For breakfast, there was a pre-Hispanic era squash and corn soup. For lunch, barbacoa carts offered a cup of the broth with the tacos. Dinner at the market was my choice between lamb tacos, goat tacos…and my favorite, a bowl of chile-laced goat consommé, served with a platter of thin sliced vegetables. And, of course, there is the garlic soup we made at Seasons of My Heart cooking school, one of the best things I ate on the trip. There is one Mexican soup that has broken through in America – tortilla soup. Why? My guess: it is essentially chicken noodle soup. Just substitute fried tortilla strips for the noodles, add the flavors of salsa (now America’s favorite national condiment), and you’re done. The other reason? It is fantastic refrigerator Velcro. This recipe is the real deal version…but my other version is a weeknight “what can I do with this leftover chicken?” recipe. No pressure cooker? No worries. See …

Pressure Cooker Tortellini en Brodo

Sorry about the heavy rotation of pressure cooker recipes. The stomach flu flattened us. A simple broth and pasta soup is all I can handle right now. When I make soup, more is better. Everything goes in the pot. What do I have in the refrigerator and pantry? Onions, celery, carrots, peppers, cabbage; noodles, rice, leftover chicken, beans, some sausage. Add it all to the soup pot. Throw in some herbs and spices for good measure. Simmer until the flavors mingle, taste for seasoning, then serve. Tortellini en Brodo is minimalist soup. Clear broth and noodles stuffed with cheese, it is as simple as soup gets. Simple doesn’t leave any place to hide. The broth has to be good for this soup to have any chance. And homemade broth is so far from canned broth that you can see the curve of the horizon. That’s where my pressure cooker comes in. It gives me great brodo in about an hour. A mix of beef and chicken adds depth to the simple broth, and a parmesan …

Turkey Miso Noodle Soup

Every year I ask you, my readers, to make turkey stock with the bones from your Thanksgiving turkey. “OK”, you say, “I made turkey stock from my twenty pound bird. Six quarts of stock are filling up my freezer. There’s no room for the ice cream. Now what?” It’s time to make soup, of course. Japanese miso soup, to be exact, with udon noodles. It’s a great way to use up the last of the turkey, and some of that tasty stock you made. You can find miso, a thick, fermented soybean paste, in tubs in the refrigerator section of well stocked grocery stores. (Or, of course, any Asian markets in your area.) Miso is a fabulous flavor enhancer, adding depth and body to anything it is used in. Miso paste clumps up if you add it directly to the soup. Stir it with a little of the turkey broth first to make a miso slurry, then stir that into the soup. *If you can find Miso and Easy, a bottle of liquid miso, buy …

Pressure Cooker Mexican Black Bean and Noodle Soup (Frijoles y Fideos)

I love my pressure cooker. Except…there’s no evaporation. Once you lock that lid, all the liquid is trapped. I’m used to a thick broth when I cook dried beans, and it’s tricky to get the amount of water right in the pressure cooker. I love noodle soup. Except…dry pasta soaks up too much liquid. I add eight ounces of pasta to a soup, and pretty soon I have noodle stew, not a soup. I should have put two and two together, but I’m a slow learner. I made pressure cooker pasta fazool – bean soup with dried pasta – and suddenly my problems were over. I had a thick bean and pasta soup. Perfect! I’m taking this idea south of the border. I combined a Mexican black bean soup with fideos, Mexico’s vermicelli noodle soup. The result is a thick black bean and pasta soup. It’s not Authentic Mexican, but it sure tastes good. Recipe: Pressure Cooker Mexican Black Bean and Noodle Soup (Frijoles y Fideos) Cooking time: 60 minutes Equipment: Pressure cooker (I used …

Turkey Ramen Soup

I say it every Thanksgiving: make stock with your turkey carcass! *My friends roll their eyes when I ramble on about the glory of after-Thanksgiving turkey soup.  I always make a traditional turkey noodle soup, but a turkey carcass makes a whole lot of stock. This year’s soup is inspired by the ramen-centered first issue of Lucky Peach.Where are the best places to eat ramen? (in Japan, of course.)  What are the regional variations? How do you make Momofuku style ramen broth? (David Chang, chef-owner of Momofuku, created Lucky Peach.) Harold McGee explains the science behind alkaline noodles. John T Edge visits New Orleans for Seventh Ward Ramen. David Chang shares Momofuku’s simple recipe for slow roast pork shoulder and pork belly.*My favorite article was Ruth Reichl’s taste testing of packaged ramen noodles. She confesses to serving tons of them when her teenage son and horde of friends descended on the kitchen.  In spite of Harold McGee’s article on how to make perfect alkaline noodles, I’m going with the old standby – packaged ramen noodles from the …

Turkey Soup with Chickpeas and Vegetables

The second best part of Thanksgiving is making soup from the leftovers. *The best part? Sitting at the table, surrounded by friends and family, while gnawing on a turkey leg from a grill-smoked turkey. Every year, I make a big pot or two of turkey stock with the carcasses from my birds. I use that stock to make one old fashioned batch of turkey noodle soup, then I use my stock to go on a world tour. *You are making turkey stock from your carcass this year, aren’t you? This year, I was aiming for an Italian style soup, with pancetta and greens. I wound up farther south on the Italian boot that I thought.  I was aiming for Tuscany.  I probably wound up in Sicily, because my freezer was missing some key ingredients! Prosciutto replaced the pancetta, chickpeas replaced the white beans, and baby spinach became the green. Even though I wound up improvising, the results were worth it. The smoky turkey stock, made from grilled birds, was the perfect broth for the shredded …

Pumpkin and Squash Soup

Diane had an unexpected bonus in our garden this year. Tim, our youngest, planted a seed while he was helping Diane, and it gave us a mystery squash that we were puzzling over for most of the summer. We assumed it was a rogue zucchini, but there was only one of them, and it kept getting bigger and rounder. It had tendrils reaching out to our deck, and was taking over one side of the 4 foot garden box it was planted in. Eventually, it became obvious, even to a garden novice like me – Tim had planted a pumpkin! Tim was so excited. He loves helping mom with the plants, and now he had a pumpkin of his very own. Every time he saw it, he would wiggle with excitement. Finally, it was a nice, bright orange, and it was time to pick it. Now what? I had to do something worthy of Timmy’s pride and joy. I went with a recipe I learned from Patrick Payet while I was in Provence. This recipe …

Quick Gazpacho

Gazpacho, the famous cold tomato soup of Spain, can seem strange to American taste buds.*I was raised to expect tomato soup to come from a can with a red and white label (just like Andy Warhol). It was also be perfectly smooth, and served with grilled cheese sandwiches. If you’ve never tried gazpacho, don’t let the unfamiliar combination of cold and tomato stop you. Gazpacho is a wonderful first course or side dish, with sweet tomatoes and sour sherry vinegar balanced out by the richness of olive oil. It is one of Spain’s most famous food exports for a reason; it is a classic combination of flavors. Gazpacho is obviously at its best with fresh, ripe summer tomatoes. In my humble opinion, it is not worth the effort to make gazpacho with those reddish, cardboard things they pass off as tomatoes grocery store tomatoes. They just don’t have enough flavor, and without the sweet flavor of tomatoes, you don’t have gazpacho. You have a very chunky vinaigrette. When I’m outside tomato season, I rely on …